Cannabinoids

Publication Title: 
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammation caused by hyperactivated effector immune cells that produce pro-inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have shown that the cannabinoid system may play a critical role in mediating protection against intestinal inflammation. However, the effect of cannabinoid receptor induction after chronic colitis progression has not been investigated. Here, we investigate the effect of cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) agonist, JWH-133, after chronic colitis in IL-10(-/-) mice.

Author(s): 
Singh, Udai P.
Singh, Narendra P.
Singh, Balwan
Price, Robert L.
Nagarkatti, Mitzi
Nagarkatti, Prakash S.
Publication Title: 
AIDS treatment news
Author(s): 
Mirken, B.
Publication Title: 
AIDS treatment news
Author(s): 
James, J. S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Cellular Biochemistry

The marijuana plant (Cannabis sativa) and preparations derived from it have been used for medicinal purposes for thousands of years. It is likely that the therapeutic benefits of smoked marijuana are due to some combination of its more than 60 cannabinoids and 200-250 non-cannabinoid constituents. Several marijuana constituents, the carboxylic acid metabolites of tetrahydrocannabinol, and synthetic analogs are free of cannabimimetic central nervous system activity, do not produce behavioral changes in humans, and are effective antiinflammatory and analgesic agents.

Author(s): 
Zurier, Robert B.
Publication Title: 
Issue Brief (Health Policy Tracking Service)

During the last few years, the debate over the use of marijuana for medical purposes has moved from the legislative arena into the public forum. Thirty six states and the District of Columbia have had statutes that address the medical utility of marijuana within the past 26 years. However, several of those states have either repealed the laws or allowed them to sunset. Since 1996, 11 states have enacted laws that allow individuals to use marijuana with a doctor's consent.

Author(s): 
Varma, Priya
Publication Title: 
Journal of Addictive Diseases

Surveys of physicians' attitudes regarding the therapeutic value of marijuana are rare. Drawing on a national sample of family physicians, general internists, obstetrician-gynecologists, psychiatrists, and addiction specialists, 960 (adjusted response rate 66%) offered opinions about the legal prescription of marijuana as medical therapy. Thirty-six percent believed prescribed marijuana should be legal and 26% were neutral to the proposition.

Author(s): 
Charuvastra, Anthony
Friedmann, Peter D.
Stein, Michael D.
Publication Title: 
Canadian Family Physician Médecin De Famille Canadien

OBJECTIVE: To describe medical marijuana use from the perspectives of patients with multiple sclerosis. DESIGN: A qualitative, descriptive design was used. Participants discussed their medicinal marijuana use in one-to-one, semistructured interviews. SETTING: Interviews were conducted at a time and place convenient to participants. PARTICIPANTS: Six men and eight women with multiple sclerosis participated. METHOD: Potential participants identified themselves to the researcher after receiving an invitation in a mailed survey.

Author(s): 
Page, Stacey A.
Verhoef, Marja J.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Therapeutics

For thousands of years, physicians and their patients employed cannabis as a therapeutic agent. Despite this extensive historical usage, in the Western world, cannabis fell into disfavor among medical professionals because the technology available in the 1800s and early 1900s did not permit reliable, standardized preparations to be developed.

Author(s): 
McCarberg, Bill H.
Barkin, Robert L.
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Pharmacology

The cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa) has been known by many names but the question remains 'Can we call it medicine?' There has been renewed interest in the value of cannabis for the control of neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis, where it has been shown to have some effect on spasticity and pain both experimentally and in clinical trials in humans.

Author(s): 
Baker, D.
Jackson, S. J.
Pryce, G.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Pain: Official Journal of the American Pain Society

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and the National Institute for Drug Abuse (NIDA) report that no sound scientific studies support the medicinal use of cannabis. Despite this lack of scientific validation, many patients routinely use "medical marijuana," and in many cases this use is for pain related to nerve injury. We conducted a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of smoking cannabis for neuropathic pain.

Author(s): 
Wilsey, Barth
Marcotte, Thomas
Tsodikov, Alexander
Millman, Jeanna
Bentley, Heather
Gouaux, Ben
Fishman, Scott

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