care

Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

AIMS: The aim of this study was to describe the nurse-patient relationships and to study how caring behaviours were described. The review question was: What factors influence the caring relationship between a nurse and patient? BACKGROUND: There is a growing perception that nurses fail to provide compassionate and competent care. Policy documents prescribe compassion as an essential aspect of care; however, the evidence drawn on remains unclear and without clear applications to practice.

Author(s): 
Wiechula, Rick
Conroy, Tiffany
Kitson, Alison L.
Marshall, Rhianon J.
Whitaker, Nancy
Rasmussen, Philippa
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy

This article seeks to explore and analyze the relationship between autonomy and trust, and to show how these findings could be relevant to medical ethics. First, I will argue that the way in which so-called "relational autonomy theories" tie the notions of autonomy and trust together is not entirely satisfying Then, I will introduce the so-called Encapsulated Interest Account as developed by Russell Hardin. This will bring out the importance of the reasons for trust. What good reasons do we have for trusting someone?

Author(s): 
Nys, Thomas
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

Providing care for patients and caring about patients should go hand in hand. Caring implicates our fundamental attitude towards patients, and our ability to convey kindness, compassion and respect. Yet all too often, patients and families experience health care as impersonal, mechanical; and quickly discover that patienthood trumps personhood. The consequences of a medical system organized around care rather than caring are considerable. Despite technical competence, patients and families are less satisfied with medical encounters when caring is lacking.

Author(s): 
Chochinov, Harvey Max
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of Sociology

A new sociological agenda is emerging that interrogates how morality can be established in the absence of the moral certainties of the past but there is a shortage of empirical work on this topic. This article establishes a theoretical framework for the empirical analysis of everyday morality drawing on the work of theorists including Ahmed, Bauman and Taylor. It uses the Australian Survey of Social Attitudes to assess the state and shape of contemporary moralities by asking how kind are Australians, how is its expression socially distributed, and what are the motivations for kindness.

Author(s): 
Habibis, Daphne
Hookway, Nicholas
Vreugdenhil, Anthea
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