Caribbean Region

Publication Title: 
Conscience (Washington, D.C.)
Author(s): 
Women's Coalition for the ICPD
Publication Title: 
Psycho-Oncology

OBJECTIVE: Happiness is a central component in quality of life but little is known about its meanings among people living with an advanced disease and those from diverse communities. This study explores and compares, for the first time, the centrality and interpretations of happiness across two cultural groups living with advanced cancer. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews among 26 Black Caribbean and 19 White British cancer patients were conducted in hospital and home settings.

Author(s): 
Koffman, Jonathan
Morgan, Myfanwy
Edmonds, Polly
Speck, Peter
Siegert, Richard
Higginson, Irene J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Youth and Adolescence

Research has accumulated to demonstrate that depressive symptoms are associated with heterosexual romantic involvement during adolescence, but relatively little work has linked this body of literature to the existing literature on associations between early pubertal timing and adolescent depressive symptoms. This study extends prior research by examining whether early menarche and heterosexual romantic involvement interact to predict depressive symptoms in a national sample of Black adolescent girls (N = 607; M age = 15 years; 32 % Caribbean Black and 68 % African American).

Author(s): 
Carter, Rona
Caldwell, Cleopatra Howard
Matusko, Niki
Jackson, James S.
Publication Title: 
BMC pregnancy and childbirth

BACKGROUND: According to the Office for National Statistics, approximately a quarter of women giving birth in England and Wales are from minority ethnic groups. Previous work has indicated that these women have poorer pregnancy outcomes than White women and poorer experience of maternity care, sometimes encountering stereotyping and racism. The aims of this study were to examine service use and perceptions of care in ethnic minority women from different groups compared to White women. METHODS: Secondary analysis of data from a survey of women in 2010 was undertaken.

Author(s): 
Henderson, Jane
Gao, Haiyan
Redshaw, Maggie
Publication Title: 
Psychological Medicine

BACKGROUND: Research suggests high levels of depression and low levels of service use among older adults from UK minority ethnic groups. This study aimed to explore older adults' attitudes and beliefs regarding what would help someone with depression, and to consider how these may facilitate or deter older people from accessing treatment. METHOD: In-depth individual qualitative interviews were conducted with older adults with depression (treated and untreated) and the non-depressed older population.

Author(s): 
Lawrence, Vanessa
Banerjee, Sube
Bhugra, Dinesh
Sangha, Kuljeet
Turner, Sara
Murray, Joanna
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease

This study explores the relationship between religious denomination, four dimensions of religious involvement, and suicidality (lifetime prevalence of suicide ideation and attempts) within a nationally representative sample of African American and Black Caribbean adults. The relationship between religious involvement and suicide for African Americans and Black Caribbeans indicated both similarities and differences.

Author(s): 
Taylor, Robert Joseph
Chatters, Linda M.
Joe, Sean
Publication Title: 
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health / Center for Minority Public Health

Studies show that cultural beliefs influence disease conceptualization, adaption, and coping strategies of chronic diseases. This study investigated the type 2 diabetes cultural belief model of English-speaking Afro-Caribbean women in southwest Florida. A 53 item cultural consensus beliefs questionnaire was designed and administered to 30 Afro-Caribbean women diabetics. Cultural consensus analysis found that these women shared a single cultural belief model about type 2 diabetes, .72 ± .081 SD.

Author(s): 
Smith, Chrystal A. S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Anxiety Disorders

Prior research is equivocal concerning the relationships between religious involvement and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The literature indicates limited evidence of denomination differences in prevalence of OCD whereas findings regarding OCD and degree of religiosity are equivocal. This study builds on prior research by examining OCD in relation to diverse measures of religious involvement within the National Survey of American Life, a nationally representative sample of African American and Black Caribbean adults.

Author(s): 
Himle, Joseph A.
Taylor, Robert Joseph
Chatters, Linda M.
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