Cat Diseases

Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

INTRODUCTION: The peer-review literature contains no controlled clinical research of homeopathy in cats and very little in dogs. MAIN OBJECTIVE: To collect clinical outcomes data systematically from individualised homeopathic treatment of cats and dogs that would help to inform controlled research in feline and canine homeopathy. METHODS: Twenty-one homeopathic veterinary surgeons recorded data systematically from consecutive feline and canine patients over a 12-month period.

Author(s): 
Mathie, Robert T.
Baitson, Elizabeth S.
Hansen, Lise
Elliott, Mark F.
Hoare, John
Publication Title: 
The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society

Companion animals represent an under-utilised resource. The present paper is designed to encourage collaborative studies. Dogs and cats are out-bred animals that are willing to consume a consistent diet for long periods, so are ideal candidates for prospective studies of naturally-occurring disease. In some studies the effect of diet on survival has been substantial.

Author(s): 
Hill, Richard C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery

Research has documented immobilization of rodents, rabbits, guinea pigs and dogs by mechanical means, typically using neck clips or inversion ('animal hypnosis'). In contrast, only a few studies of mechanical immobilization of cats are available, although some success has been reported in the literature. Domestic cats may be effectively immobilized by clips placed along the animal's dorsum.

Author(s): 
Pozza, Megan E.
Stella, Judi L.
Chappuis-Gagnon, Anne-Claire
Wagner, Susan O.
Buffington, C. A. Tony
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association

The use of complementary and alternative medical therapies is becoming widespread. The objective of this study was to examine the use of complementary and alternative therapies in dogs and cats with cancer. The types of modalities used, the intended purpose for each modality, sources of information pet owners used, and the level of interest in these modalities were all evaluated. Information was obtained by written survey, and 254 owners agreed to participate. Complementary and alternative therapy use was commonplace, with 76% of surveyed owners reporting some use.

Author(s): 
Lana, Susan E.
Kogan, Lori R.
Crump, Ken A.
Graham, J. Terry
Robinson, Narda G.
Publication Title: 
Tijdschrift Voor Diergeneeskunde

This article reviews the present state of the art of resuscitation of dogs and cats. The purpose of resuscitation is to revive animals so that the vital functions resume together with a normal brain function. Resuscitation must be started as soon as the cardiopulmonary arrest has been confirmed. Adequate ventilation and effective circulation to the most vital body organs, the heart and the brain, have the highest priority.

Author(s): 
How, K. L.
Reens, N.
Stokhof, A. A.
Hellebrekers, L. J.
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

INTRODUCTION: The peer-review literature contains no controlled clinical research of homeopathy in cats and very little in dogs. MAIN OBJECTIVE: To collect clinical outcomes data systematically from individualised homeopathic treatment of cats and dogs that would help to inform controlled research in feline and canine homeopathy. METHODS: Twenty-one homeopathic veterinary surgeons recorded data systematically from consecutive feline and canine patients over a 12-month period.

Author(s): 
Mathie, Robert T.
Baitson, Elizabeth S.
Hansen, Lise
Elliott, Mark F.
Hoare, John
Publication Title: 
The Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice

This article presents an overview of alternative therapies for skin disorders including traditional Chinese medicine (acupuncture and Chinese herbs), homeopathy, and Western herbs and plant extracts. The medical and veterinary literature on the aforementioned modalities will be reviewed with a focus on reduction of inflammation and pruritus of the skin and ear canal in the canine species. Clinical application and potential adverse effects will also be included when available.

Author(s): 
Budgin, Jeanne B.
Flaherty, Molly J.
Publication Title: 
The Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice

Veterinary patients in palliative and hospice care have progressive and often degenerative diseases that can cause pain as well as loss of function and decreased quality of life. These patients can often benefit from the application of physical medicine and rehabilitation techniques to maximize comfort and function. Physical medicine and rehabilitation are most effective as adjuncts to pharmacologic pain management. Physical medicine and rehabilitation can decrease the doses of analgesics required to keep these patients comfortable.

Author(s): 
Downing, Robin
Publication Title: 
The Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice

Over the past several decades, alternative medicines have gained in popularity for use in both humans and animals. While they are not without controversy, client interest and usage dictate that even those practitioners who do not want to practice any of them in their own hospital or clinic should at least be aware of their common use, safety, and efficacy. The author briefly discusses some of the more popular alternative medicines—acupuncture, chiropractic, herbal, homeopathic, and flower essences—with respect to some of the basics that every practitioner should know about them.

Author(s): 
Kidd, J. Randy
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