Catheterization

Publication Title: 
Neuroradiology

Iatrogenic neurological deficit constitutes the greatest risk during therapeutic embolization in the vascular territories of the carotid and vertebral arteries. Constant monitoring of the patient's neurological status is therefore essential. The authors discuss the use of medical hypnosis to circumvent general anesthesia and to reduce chemical sedation to a minimum. Their experience with this technique is presented.

Author(s): 
Bank, W. O.
Kerber, C. W.
Publication Title: 
Gut

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: We have previously shown that hypnosis can be used to study the effect of different emotions on the motility of the gastrointestinal tract. These studies demonstrated that both anger and excitement increased colonic motility while happiness led to a reduction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of hypnotically induced emotion on the visceral sensitivity of the gut.

Author(s): 
Houghton, L. A.
Calvert, E. L.
Jackson, N. A.
Cooper, P.
Whorwell, P. J.
Publication Title: 
Anesthesiology

BACKGROUND: It is well documented that several general anesthetics, including propofol, potentiate glycine receptor function. Furthermore, glycine receptors exist throughout the central nervous system, including areas of the brain thought to be involved in sleep. However, the role of glycine receptors in anesthetic-induced hypnosis has not been determined. METHODS: Experiments were conducted in rats where the loss of righting reflex (LORR) was used as a marker of the hypnotic state.

Author(s): 
Nguyen, Hai T.
Li, Ke-yong
daGraca, Ralph L.
Delphin, Ellise
Xiong, Ming
Ye, Jiang H.
Publication Title: 
Current Opinion in Obstetrics & Gynecology

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The percentage of induced live birth has more than doubled from the 1990s to 2008. Induction of labour can either be based on medical indications, or performed as an elective procedure. A large range of pharmacological and non-pharmacological modalities are available for the induction of labour and the optimal method for labour induction is unknown. This article is aimed to examine literature on non-hormonal methods for labour induction, published from January 2012 to May 2013. RECENT FINDINGS: Eleven studies were identified in our search and included into the review.

Author(s): 
Lim, Chi Eung Danforn
Ng, Rachel Wai Chung
Xu, Ke
Publication Title: 
Drug Metabolism and Disposition: The Biological Fate of Chemicals

The purpose of present study was to determine the intestinal absorption and metabolism of genistein and its analogs to better understand the mechanisms responsible for their low oral bioavailability. The Caco-2 cell culture model and a perfused rat intestinal model were used for the study. In both models, permeabilities of aglycones (e.g., genistein) were comparable to well absorbed compounds, such as testosterone and propranolol.

Author(s): 
Liu, Yan
Hu, Ming
Publication Title: 
NeuroImage

Pain requires the integration of sensory, cognitive, and affective information. The use of placebo is a common methodological ploy in many fields, including pain. Neuroimaging studies of pain and placebo analgesia (PA) have yet to identify a mechanism of action. Because PA must result from higher order processes, it is likely influenced by cognitive and affective dimensions of the pain experience.

Author(s): 
Craggs, Jason G.
Price, Donald D.
Verne, G. Nicholas
Perlstein, William M.
Robinson, Michael M.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Neuroscience: The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience

Cognitive factors such as fear of pain and symptom-related anxiety play an important role in chronic pain states. The current study sought to characterize abnormalities in preparatory brain response before aversive pelvic visceral distention in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients and their possible relationship to the consequences of distention. The brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response to anticipated and delivered mild and moderate rectal distention was recorded from 14 female IBS patients and 12 healthy controls.

Author(s): 
Berman, Steven M.
Naliboff, Bruce D.
Suyenobu, Brandall
Labus, Jennifer S.
Stains, Jean
Ohning, Gordon
Kilpatrick, Lisa
Bueller, Joshua A.
Ruby, Kim
Jarcho, Johanna
Mayer, Emeran A.
Publication Title: 
Pain

Previously, we demonstrated that placebo analgesia (PA) accompanies reductions in neural activity during painful stimulation. This study investigated areas of the brain where the neural activity was increased during PA. The literature has associated PA with two potential mechanisms of action; one sustained (e.g., engaged for the duration of PA), the other, transitory (e.g., a feedback mechanism). We propose that PA results from the engagement of two complementary pain-modulation mechanisms that are identified with fMRI data as a main effect for condition or a time *condition interaction.

Author(s): 
Craggs, Jason G.
Price, Donald D.
Perlstein, William M.
Verne, G. Nicholas
Robinson, Michael E.
Publication Title: 
Anesthesiology

BACKGROUND: It is well documented that several general anesthetics, including propofol, potentiate glycine receptor function. Furthermore, glycine receptors exist throughout the central nervous system, including areas of the brain thought to be involved in sleep. However, the role of glycine receptors in anesthetic-induced hypnosis has not been determined. METHODS: Experiments were conducted in rats where the loss of righting reflex (LORR) was used as a marker of the hypnotic state.

Author(s): 
Nguyen, Hai T.
Li, Ke-yong
daGraca, Ralph L.
Delphin, Ellise
Xiong, Ming
Ye, Jiang H.
Publication Title: 
Lymphatic Research and Biology

BACKGROUND: Osteopathic lymphatic pump treatments (LPT) are used to treat edema, but their direct effects on lymph flow have not been studied. In the current study, we examined the effects of LPT on lymph flow in the thoracic duct of instrumented conscious dogs in the presence of edema produced by constriction of the inferior vena cava (IVC). METHODS AND RESULTS: Six dogs were surgically instrumented with an ultrasonic flow transducer on the thoracic lymph duct and catheters in the descending thoracic aorta and in IVC.

Author(s): 
Prajapati, Parna
Shah, Pankhil
King, Hollis H.
Williams, Arthur G.
Desai, Pratikkumar
Downey, H. Fred

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