Cell Aggregation

Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

The aqueous extract from Terminalia chebula was tested for its ability to inhibit the growth and some physiological functions of Streptococcus mutans. The extract strongly inhibited the growth, sucrose induced adherence and glucan induced aggregation of S. mutans. Mouthrinsing with a 10% solution of the extract inhibited the salivary bacterial count and salivary glycolysis.

Author(s): 
Jagtap, A. G.
Karkera, S. G.
Publication Title: 
Cellular and molecular life sciences: CMLS

Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), expressed by human lung mast cells (HLMCs), mediates their adhesion to airway smooth muscle (ASM), and contributes to ASM-dependent HLMC proliferation and survival. CADM1 is expressed in alternatively spliced isoforms, but those present in HLMCs and their function are not known. We cloned three functional and one cryptic non-functional isoform with alternative splicing between exons 7/11 and 1/2, respectively, from HLMCs and human MC lines (HMC-1 and LAD2).

Author(s): 
Moiseeva, Elena P.
Leyland, Mark L.
Bradding, Peter
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

The formation of polyglutamine-containing aggregates and inclusions are hallmarks of pathogenesis in Huntington's disease that can be recapitulated in model systems. Although the contribution of inclusions to pathogenesis is unclear, cell-based assays can be used to screen for chemical compounds that affect aggregation and may provide therapeutic benefit. We have developed inducible PC12 cell-culture models to screen for loss of visible aggregates.

Author(s): 
Apostol, Barbara L.
Kazantsev, Alexsey
Raffioni, Simona
Illes, Katalin
Pallos, Judit
Bodai, Laszlo
Slepko, Natalia
Bear, James E.
Gertler, Frank B.
Hersch, Steven
Housman, David E.
Marsh, J. Lawrence
Thompson, Leslie Michels
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Glycyrrhizin, an abundant bioactive component of the medicinal licorice root is rapidly metabolized by gut commensal bacteria into 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA). Either or both of these compounds have been shown to have antiviral, anti-hepatotoxic, anti-ulcerative, anti-tumor, anti-allergenic and anti-inflammatory activity in vitro or in vivo. In this study, the ability of GRA to modulate immune responses at the small intestinal mucosa when delivered orally was investigated.

Author(s): 
Hendricks, Jay M.
Hoffman, Carol
Pascual, David W.
Hardy, Michele E.
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