Cell Growth Processes

Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

Aging poses one of the largest risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease. The increased propensity toward vascular pathology with advancing age maybe explained, in part, by a reduction in the ability of circulating endothelial progenitor cells to contribute to vascular repair and regeneration. Although there is evidence to suggest that colony forming unit-Hill cells and circulating angiogenic cells are subject to age-associated changes that impair their function, the impact of aging on human outgrowth endothelial cell (OEC) function has been less studied.

Author(s): 
Williamson, Kate A.
Hamilton, Andrew
Reynolds, John A.
Sipos, Peter
Crocker, Ian
Stringer, Sally E.
Alexander, Yvonne M.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

The telomerase ribonucleoprotein is a promising target for cancer therapy, as it is highly active in many human malignancies. A novel telomerase targeting approach combines short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of endogenous human telomerase RNA (hTer) with expression of a mutant-template hTer (MT-hTer). Such combination MT-hTer/siRNA constructs induce a rapid DNA damage response, telomere uncapping, and inhibition of cell proliferation in a variety of human cancer cell lines.

Author(s): 
Goldkorn, Amir
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

Withaferin A (WA) is derived from the medicinal plant Withania somnifera, which has been safely used for centuries in Indian Ayurvedic medicine for treatment of different ailments. We now show, for the first time, that WA exhibits significant activity against human breast cancer cells in culture and in vivo. The WA treatment decreased viability of MCF-7 (estrogen-responsive) and MDA-MB-231 (estrogen-independent) human breast cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner.

Author(s): 
Stan, Silvia D.
Hahm, Eun-Ryeong
Warin, Renaud
Singh, Shivendra V.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

Withaferin A (WA) is derived from the medicinal plant Withania somnifera, which has been safely used for centuries in Indian Ayurvedic medicine for treatment of different ailments. We now show, for the first time, that WA exhibits significant activity against human breast cancer cells in culture and in vivo. The WA treatment decreased viability of MCF-7 (estrogen-responsive) and MDA-MB-231 (estrogen-independent) human breast cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner.

Author(s): 
Stan, Silvia D.
Hahm, Eun-Ryeong
Warin, Renaud
Singh, Shivendra V.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

Most prostate cancer patients develop androgen-independent recurrent prostate tumors a few years after androgen ablation therapy. No therapy, however, has been shown to substantially extend survival in these patients. Previously, we reported that androgen suppresses the growth of androgen-independent LNCaP prostate tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. In cell culture, androgen receptor (AR)-rich androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R1 cells adapt to growth suppression by androgen and then their growth is androgen stimulated.

Author(s): 
Chuu, Chih-Pin
Hiipakka, Richard A.
Fukuchi, Junichi
Kokontis, John M.
Liao, Shutsung
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], the active metabolite of vitamin D3, inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits the proliferation of these cells remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we used microarray technology to identify target genes of 1,25(OH)2D3 in androgen-responsive prostate cancer LNCaP cells. 1,25(OH)2D3 up-regulated CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta (C/EBPdelta) by approximately 5-fold in these cells.

Author(s): 
Ikezoe, Takayuki
Gery, Sigal
Yin, Dong
O'Kelly, James
Binderup, Lise
Lemp, Nathan
Taguchi, Hirokuni
Koeffler, H. Phillip
Publication Title: 
Anticancer Research

The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is an 18-kDa high affinity drug- and cholesterol-binding protein that is involved in various cell functions, including cell proliferation and apoptosis. PBR was shown to be overexpressed in certain types of malignant human tumors and cancer cell lines, correlating with enhanced tumorigenicity and cell proliferation rates. The present study was conducted in order to further define the role of PBR in cancer and to extend our recent findings regarding the possible anticancer effects of the standardized Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761.

Author(s): 
Pretner, Ewald
Amri, Hakima
Li, Wenping
Brown, Rachel
Lin, Chin-Shoou
Makariou, Erini
Defeudis, Francis V.
Drieu, Katy
Papadopoulos, Vassilios
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

Androgen-dependent human LNCaP 104-S tumor xenografts progressed to androgen-independent relapsed tumors (104-Rrel) in athymic mice after castration. The growth of 104-Rrel tumors was suppressed by testosterone. However, 104-Rrel tumors adapted to androgen and regrew as androgen-stimulated 104-Radp tumors. Androgen receptor expression in tumors and serum prostate-specific antigen increased during progression from 104-S to 104-Rrel but decreased during transition from 104-Rrel to 104-Radp. Expression of genes related to liver X receptor (LXR) signaling changed during progression.

Author(s): 
Chuu, Chih-Pin
Hiipakka, Richard A.
Kokontis, John M.
Fukuchi, Junichi
Chen, Rou-Yu
Liao, Shutsung
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

We have shown previously that endogenous deficiency of interleukin (IL)-12 promotes photocarcinogenesis in mice. To characterize the role of IL-12 deficiency in tumor angiogenesis, we developed IL-12p35 knockout (IL-12 KO) mice on a C3H/HeN background. IL-12 KO mice and their wild-type (WT) counterparts were subjected to a photocarcinogenesis protocol. When tumor yield was stabilized, samples of tumor and tumor-uninvolved UVB-exposed skin were collected and subjected to immunohistochemistry, gelatinolytic zymography, real-time PCR, and Western blot analysis of angiogenic factors.

Author(s): 
Meeran, Syed M.
Katiyar, Suchitra
Elmets, Craig A.
Katiyar, Santosh K.
Publication Title: 
Anticancer Research

BACKGROUND: Previous studies indicate that specific extracts and the pure triterpene glycoside actein obtained from black cohosh inhibit growth of human breast cancer cells. Our aim is to identify alterations in gene expression induced by treatment with a methanolic extract (MeOH) of black cohosh. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We treated MDA-MB-453 human breast cancer cells with the MeOH extract at 40 microg/ml and collected RNA at 6 and 24 h; we confirmed the microarray results with real-time RT-PCR for 18 genes.

Author(s): 
Einbond, Linda Saxe
Su, Tao
Wu, Hsan-au
Friedman, Richard
Wang, Xiaomei
Jiang, Bei
Hagan, Timothy
Kennelly, Edward J.
Kronenberg, Fredi
Weinstein, I. Bernard

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