Cholesterol, Dietary

Publication Title: 
International Journal of Cardiology

Four groups of 25 rabbits each, were studied to determine the effect of Haritaki (Terminalia chebula), Amla (Emblica officinalis) and Bahira (Terminalia belerica) on cholesterol-induced hypercholesteolaemia and atherosclerosis. The control group was fed with cholesterol alone; the Haritaki group received Haritaki and cholesterol; the Bahira group received Bahira and cholesterol; and the Amla group received Amla and cholesterol for 16 weeks.

Author(s): 
Thakur, C. P.
Thakur, B.
Singh, S.
Sinha, P. K.
Sinha, S. K.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Cardiology

The effect of orally administered indigenous drugs Terminalia arjuna, T. belerica and T. chebula were investigated on experimental atherosclerosis. Rabbits were fed a cholesterol-rich diet to induce atherosclerosis. The three drugs were fed along with cholesterol. At the end of the experimental period the animals were killed and their plasma and tissue lipid components estimated. Atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta were examined histologically. T. arjuna was found to be the most potent hypolipidemic agent and induced partial inhibition of rabbit atheroma. The results indicate that T.

Author(s): 
Shaila, H. P.
Udupa, S. L.
Udupa, A. L.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Medicine

Recent studies have implicated elevated levels of serum estradiol in males as the major predisposing factor for myocardial infarction, with serum cholesterol playing a secondary role. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of a high-complex-carbohydrate, low-fat, low-cholesterol diet and daily exercise on levels of serum estradiol, testosterone, and lipids in males. Twenty-one males participating in the Pritikin Longevity Center 26-day residential program volunteered for the study.

Author(s): 
Rosenthal, M. B.
Barnard, R. J.
Rose, D. P.
Inkeles, S.
Hall, J.
Pritikin, N.
Publication Title: 
Pediatric Clinics of North America

The pathogenetic links between diet and diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis remain the subject of much controversy. This article reviews the evidence about the relationship between diet and these two widespread adult conditions, proposes an approach for their early recognition, examines the rationale and safety of dietary changes, and formulates specific recommendations.

Author(s): 
Roy, C. C.
Galeano, N.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American College of Nutrition

Physicians and parents are very concerned about providing children with the best nutrition and optimal diets. The pursuit of better health is one of the prime reasons for individual food choices. Often the main determinant in selecting food is a desire for a healthful diet that will foster longevity and prevent the devastating consequences of chronic degenerative disease. However, unlike nutritional deficiencies, which undoubtedly afflict those who consume an inadequate diet, the underlying causes of these chronic disorders are complex and poorly understood.

Author(s): 
Lifshitz, F.
Publication Title: 
Zeitschrift F¸r Kardiologie

Certain dietary components play a key role for the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). Complex carbohydrates lower the prevalence of CAD. Protein should provide 15% of daily calories. Populations with a high consumption of soy protein have a low coronary event rate and a high life expectancy. Soy protein has a favorable effect on LDL cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL cholesterol. Dietary cholesterol correlates with an increased incidence of CAD. Saturated fats increase cholesterol levels as well as the activity of clotting factor VII and promote progression of CAD.

Author(s): 
Gohlke, H.
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of Nutrition

The longevity and excellent health status of the population of Crete has been attributed to its lifestyle and dietary habits. The impact of Greek Orthodox Christian Church fasting on these dietary habits has never been studied. One hundred and twenty Greek Orthodox Christians living in Crete participated in a 1-year prospective study. One half of the subjects, who fasted regularly (fasters), and sixty non-faster controls were followed longitudinally for the three main fasting periods over 1 year; Christmas (40 d), Lent (48 d) and the Assumption (15 d).

Author(s): 
Sarri, Katerina O.
Linardakis, Manolis K.
Bervanaki, Frosso N.
Tzanakis, Nikolaos E.
Kafatos, Anthony G.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Biomedical Science

Taurine (T) was first noted as beneficial for stroke and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) prevention in genetic rat models, stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). The preventive mechanisms of T were ascribed to sympathetic modulation for reducing blood pressure (BP) and anti-inflammatory action. Recent epidemiological surveys revealed the involvement of inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of stroke and also atherosclerosis for which T was proven to be effective experimentally.

Author(s): 
Yamori, Yukio
Taguchi, Takashi
Hamada, Atsumi
Kunimasa, Kazuhiro
Mori, Hideki
Mori, Mari
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Cardiology

Four groups of 25 rabbits each, were studied to determine the effect of Haritaki (Terminalia chebula), Amla (Emblica officinalis) and Bahira (Terminalia belerica) on cholesterol-induced hypercholesteolaemia and atherosclerosis. The control group was fed with cholesterol alone; the Haritaki group received Haritaki and cholesterol; the Bahira group received Bahira and cholesterol; and the Amla group received Amla and cholesterol for 16 weeks.

Author(s): 
Thakur, C. P.
Thakur, B.
Singh, S.
Sinha, P. K.
Sinha, S. K.
Publication Title: 
Annual Review of Nutrition

The resin of the Commiphora mukul tree has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for more than 2000 years to treat a variety of ailments. Studies in both animal models and humans have shown that this resin, termed gum guggul, can decrease elevated lipid levels. The stereoisomers E- and Z-guggulsterone have been identified as the active agents in this resin. Recent studies have shown that these compounds are antagonist ligands for the bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is an important regulator of cholesterol homeostasis.

Author(s): 
Urizar, Nancy L.
Moore, David D.

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