Chronic Pain

Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

Background: A 2007 American College of Physicians guideline addressed nonpharmacologic treatment options for low back pain. New evidence is now available. Purpose: To systematically review the current evidence on nonpharmacologic therapies for acute or chronic nonradicular or radicular low back pain. Data Sources: Ovid MEDLINE (January 2008 through February 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists.

Author(s): 
Chou, Roger
Deyo, Richard
Friedly, Janna
Skelly, Andrea
Hashimoto, Robin
Weimer, Melissa
Fu, Rochelle
Dana, Tracy
Kraegel, Paul
Griffin, Jessica
Grusing, Sara
Brodt, Erika D.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is defined as pain lasting beyond normal tissue healing time, generally taken to be 12 weeks. It contributes to disability, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbances, poor quality of life, and healthcare costs. Chronic pain has a weighted mean prevalence in adults of 20%.For many years, the treatment choice for chronic pain included recommendations for rest and inactivity.

Author(s): 
Geneen, Louise J.
Moore, R. Andrew
Clarke, Clare
Martin, Denis
Colvin, Lesley A.
Smith, Blair H.
Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

OBJECTIVE: This manuscript reviews peer-reviewed literature published from 2010-2012 relevant to the management of chronic pain in the primary care setting. DESIGN: Narrative review of peer-reviewed literature. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, and reference lists and queried expert contacts for English-language studies related to the management of chronic noncancer pain in adult patients in primary care settings.

Author(s): 
Frank, Joseph W.
Bair, Matthew J.
Becker, William C.
Krebs, Erin E.
Liebschutz, Jane M.
Alford, Daniel P.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

Description: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on noninvasive treatment of low back pain. Methods: Using the ACP grading system, the committee based these recommendations on a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews published through April 2015 on noninvasive pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments for low back pain. Updated searches were performed through November 2016.

Author(s): 
Qaseem, Amir
Wilt, Timothy J.
McLean, Robert M.
Forciea, Mary Ann
Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is defined as pain lasting beyond normal tissue healing time, generally taken to be 12 weeks. It contributes to disability, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbances, poor quality of life, and healthcare costs. Chronic pain has a weighted mean prevalence in adults of 20%.For many years, the treatment choice for chronic pain included recommendations for rest and inactivity.

Author(s): 
Geneen, Louise J.
Moore, R. Andrew
Clarke, Clare
Martin, Denis
Colvin, Lesley A.
Smith, Blair H.
Publication Title: 
Mayo Clinic Proceedings

Although most pain is acute and resolves within a few days or weeks, millions of Americans have persistent or recurring pain that may become chronic and debilitating. Medications may provide only partial relief from this chronic pain and can be associated with unwanted effects. As a result, many individuals turn to complementary health approaches as part of their pain management strategy.

Author(s): 
Nahin, Richard L.
Boineau, Robin
Khalsa, Partap S.
Stussman, Barbara J.
Weber, Wendy J.
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology International

A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of meditative movement therapies (Qigong, Tai Chi and Yoga) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) was carried out. We screened Clinicaltrials.Gov, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed and Scopus (through December 2010) and the reference sections of original studies for meditative movement therapies (MMT) in FMS. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing MMT to controls were analysed. Outcomes of efficacy were pain, sleep, fatigue, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Author(s): 
Langhorst, Jost
Klose, Petra
Dobos, Gustav J.
Bernardy, Kathrin
Häuser, Winfried
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Non-specific low back pain is a common, potentially disabling condition usually treated with self-care and non-prescription medication. For chronic low back pain, current guidelines state that exercise therapy may be beneficial. Yoga is a mind-body exercise sometimes used for non-specific low back pain. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of yoga for treating chronic non-specific low back pain, compared to no specific treatment, a minimal intervention (e.g. education), or another active treatment, with a focus on pain, function, and adverse events.

Author(s): 
Wieland, L. Susan
Skoetz, Nicole
Pilkington, Karen
Vempati, Ramaprabhu
D'Adamo, Christopher R.
Berman, Brian M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Orthopedics & Rheumatology

OBJECTIVES: Chronic low back pain (CLBP) affects millions of people worldwide, and appears to be increasing in prevalence. It is associated not only with pain, but also with increased disability, psychological symptoms, and reduced quality of life. There are various treatment options for CLBP, but no single therapy stands out as being the most effective. In the past 10 years, yoga interventions have been studied as a CLBP treatment approach. The objective of this paper is to review the current literature supporting the efficacy of yoga for CLBP.

Author(s): 
Chang, Douglas G.
Holt, Jacquelyn A.
Sklar, Marisa
Groessl, Erik J.
Publication Title: 
The Clinical Journal of Pain

OBJECTIVES: To systematically review and meta-analyze the effectiveness of yoga for low back pain. METHODS: MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, CAMBASE, and PsycINFO, were screened through January 2012. Randomized controlled trials comparing yoga to control conditions in patients with low back pain were included. Two authors independently assessed risk of bias using the risk of bias tool recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Main outcome measures were pain, back-specific disability, generic disability, health-related quality of life, and global improvement.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Haller, Heidemarie
Dobos, Gustav

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