Cimetidine

Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Molluscum contagiosum is a common skin infection that is caused by a pox virus and occurs mainly in children. The infection usually resolves within months in people without immune deficiency, but treatment may be preferred for social and cosmetic reasons or to avoid spreading the infection. A clear evidence base supporting the various treatments is lacking.This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2006, and updated previously in 2009.

Author(s): 
van der Wouden, Johannes C.
van der Sande, Renske
Kruithof, Emma J.
Sollie, Annet
van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette Wa
Koning, Sander
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Molluscum contagiosum is a common skin infection, caused by a virus, which will usually resolve within months in people with a normal immune system. Many treatments have been promoted for molluscum contagiosum but a clear evidence base supporting them is lacking. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of management strategies (including waiting for natural resolution) for cutaneous, non-genital molluscum contagiosum in healthy people.

Author(s): 
van der Wouden, J. C.
Menke, J.
Gajadin, S.
Koning, S.
Tasche, M. J. A.
van Suijlekom-Smit, L. W. A.
Berger, M. Y.
Butler, C. C.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Molluscum contagiosum is a common skin infection, caused by a pox virus. The infection will usually resolve within months in people with a normal immune system. Many treatments have been used for molluscum contagiosum but a clear evidence base supporting them is lacking.This is an updated version of the original Cochrane Review published in Issue 2, 2006. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of management strategies (including waiting for natural resolution) for cutaneous, non-genital molluscum contagiosum in otherwise healthy people.

Author(s): 
van der Wouden, Johannes C.
van der Sande, Renske
van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette Wa
Berger, Marjolein
Butler, Christopher C.
Koning, Sander
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), of which there are over 100 types, which probably infects the skin via areas of minimal trauma. Risk factors include use of communal showers, occupational handling of meat, and immunosuppression. In immunocompetent people, warts are harmless and resolve as a result of natural immunity within months or years. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for warts (non-genital)?

Author(s): 
Loo, Steven King-Fan
Tang, William Yuk-Ming
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Dermatological Treatment

BACKGROUND: Systemic therapies are routinely used for the management of cutaneous warts. However, there is a lack of evidence-based data on their effectiveness. OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence for the efficacy of systemic treatments for cutaneous warts. METHODS: We designed a systematic review of the randomized controlled clinical trials (1962 to April 2010) investigating systemic therapies for the treatment of cutaneous warts. We obtained data from MEDLINE, PubMed, Current Contents, reference lists, and specialist textbooks, with no restriction on language.

Author(s): 
Simonart, Thierry
de Maertelaer, Viviane
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Dermatological Treatment

BACKGROUND: Systemic therapies are routinely used for the management of cutaneous warts. However, there is a lack of evidence-based data on their effectiveness. OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence for the efficacy of systemic treatments for cutaneous warts. METHODS: We designed a systematic review of the randomized controlled clinical trials (1962 to April 2010) investigating systemic therapies for the treatment of cutaneous warts. We obtained data from MEDLINE, PubMed, Current Contents, reference lists, and specialist textbooks, with no restriction on language.

Author(s): 
Simonart, Thierry
de Maertelaer, Viviane
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: The leaves and root of Flabellaria paniculata (Malpighiaceae) are frequently used in the treatment of wounds and ulcers in Nigerian folk medicine. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of ethanolic extracts from the leaves (FPL) and root (FPR) of F. paniculata on gastric ulcers in rats. METHODS: The effect of FPL and FPR (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) was evaluated in ethanol and indomethacin gastric ulcer models. Control groups for FPL and FPR were orally treated with 3% Tween 20 and distilled water respectively. FPL was further investigated in pylorus ligation model.

Author(s): 
Sofidiya, Margaret O.
Agufobi, Lilian
Akindele, Abidemi J.
Olowe, Johnson A.
Familoni, Oluwole B.
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