Clinical Competence

Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health

The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of nurses toward the effectiveness and safety, as well as their recommendations for and personal use of complementary and alternative medical therapies. A, random sample of 1000 nurses throughout the United States were surveyed using a three-wave mailing. About half of the respondents perceived there was conclusive evidence or preponderance of evidence that five therapies were effective: biofeedback, chiropractic, meditation/relaxation, multi-vitamins, and massage therapy.

Author(s): 
Brolinson, P. G.
Price, J. H.
Ditmyer, M.
Reis, D.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health

The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of nurses toward the effectiveness and safety, as well as their recommendations for and personal use of complementary and alternative medical therapies. A, random sample of 1000 nurses throughout the United States were surveyed using a three-wave mailing. About half of the respondents perceived there was conclusive evidence or preponderance of evidence that five therapies were effective: biofeedback, chiropractic, meditation/relaxation, multi-vitamins, and massage therapy.

Author(s): 
Brolinson, P. G.
Price, J. H.
Ditmyer, M.
Reis, D.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: High levels of stress have been identified in medical students and increasingly in other health profession student population groups. As stress can affect psychological well-being and interfere with learning and clinical performance, there is a clear argument for universities to include health professional student well-being as an outcome in core curriculum. Mindfulness training is a potential construct to manage stress and enhance academic success.

Author(s): 
McConville, Janet
McAleer, Rachael
Hahne, Andrew
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Introducing holism and complementary medicine into mainstream medical education provides many scientific, philosophical, and personal challenges. The growth of new knowledge always necessitates venturing into areas, which are, by definition, unknown, hence arise potential clashes of ideology, knowledge, evidence, interpretation, language, and personality. This paper outlines some of the experience and progress made at Monash University Victoria, Australia, in teaching this material in undergraduate medical education.

Author(s): 
Hassed, Craig S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nursing: Official Publication of The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society

Pregnancy presents many problems without working through additional problems in coping with an ostomy. Yet many women with an ostomy do get pregnant and do deliver healthy babies. Evidence-based nursing is of the utmost importance, as there is little published information on this topic. Because of the scarcity of pregnant subjects within the ostomy category, most studies, by necessity, select a purposive subject base. Therefore, other information sources regarding nursing management of the pregnant woman with an ostomy take on considerably more importance.

Author(s): 
Sredl, Darlene
Aukamp, Virginia
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pharmacy Practice

Proper drug information (DI) skills are essential for being a competent pharmacy practitioner. To effectively manage DI queries and clinical dilemmas, the practitioner should follow a systematic approach that includes identifying the requester, determining the "true" DI need and obtaining background information, categorizing the question, performing the search and analyzing the information, disseminating the information, and following up when appropriate.

Author(s): 
Nathan, Joseph P.
Publication Title: 
Fortschritte Der Neurologie-Psychiatrie

During the last two decades a number of psychotherapies have been developed which are summarised as the third wave of cognitive behavioural therapies. Among these are dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT), acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), schema therapy, cognitive behavioural analysis system of psychotherapy (CBASP), mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), and metacognitive therapy (MCT). The purpose of this article is to describe the basic concepts of these treatments and to summarise available studies concerning their efficacy.

Author(s): 
Kahl, K. G.
Winter, L.
Schweiger, U.
Sipos, V.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

AIMS: The aim of this study was to describe the nurse-patient relationships and to study how caring behaviours were described. The review question was: What factors influence the caring relationship between a nurse and patient? BACKGROUND: There is a growing perception that nurses fail to provide compassionate and competent care. Policy documents prescribe compassion as an essential aspect of care; however, the evidence drawn on remains unclear and without clear applications to practice.

Author(s): 
Wiechula, Rick
Conroy, Tiffany
Kitson, Alison L.
Marshall, Rhianon J.
Whitaker, Nancy
Rasmussen, Philippa

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