Clinical Trials as Topic

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the scientific evidence on guggul for hyperlipidemia including expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing. METHODS: Electronic searches were conducted in nine databases, 20 additional journals (not indexed in common databases), and bibliographies from 50 selected secondary references. No restrictions were placed on language or quality of publications.

Author(s): 
Ulbricht, Catherine
Basch, Ethan
Szapary, Philippe
Hammerness, Paul
Axentsev, Serguei
Boon, Heather
Kroll, David
Garraway, Levi
Vora, Mamta
Woods, Jen
Natural Standard Research Collaboration
Publication Title: 
Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

Surveys have demonstrated that complementary medicine use for depression is widespread, although patterns of use vary. A series of systematic reviews provide a summary of the current evidence for acupuncture, aromatherapy and massage, homeopathy, meditation, reflexology, herbal medicine, yoga, and several dietary supplements and relaxation techniques. The quantity and quality of individual studies vary widely, but research interest in complementary therapies is increasing, particularly in herbal and nutritional products.

Author(s): 
Pilkington, Karen
Rampes, Hagen
Richardson, Janet
Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

CONTEXT: Self-management strategies for pain hold substantial promise as a means of reducing pain and improving function among older adults with chronic pain, but their use in this age group has not been well defined. OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence regarding self-management interventions for pain due to musculoskeletal disorders among older adults.

Author(s): 
Reid, M. Carrington
Papaleontiou, Maria
Ong, Anthony
Breckman, Risa
Wethington, Elaine
Pillemer, Karl
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To provide a descriptive overview of the clinical trials assessing meditation practices for health care. DESIGN: Systematic review of the literature. Comprehensive searches were conducted in 17 electronic bibliographic databases through September 2005. Other sources of potentially relevant studies included hand searches, reference tracking, contacting experts, and gray literature searches. Included studies were clinical trials with 10 or more adult participants using any meditation practice, providing quantitative data on health-related outcomes, and published in English.

Author(s): 
Ospina, Maria B.
Bond, Kenneth
Karkhaneh, Mohammad
Buscemi, Nina
Dryden, Donna M.
Barnes, Vernon
Carlson, Linda E.
Dusek, Jeffery A.
Shannahoff-Khalsa, David
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of starting antiepileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of drug monotherapy in people with partial epilepsy? What are the effects of additional drug treatments in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy?

Author(s): 
Maguire, Melissa
Marson, Anthony G.
Ramaratnam, Sridharan
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To summarize and evaluate evidence for the effect of yoga on menstrual disorders. METHODS: PubMed, CINAHL/MEDLINE, Web of Science, AMED, and Scopus were searched for English-language literature relevant to the review question. All primary research studies were included. RESULTS: Fifteen studies described in 18 papers were included in the review. A range of yoga interventions were used. Some studies used a combination of Asana, Pranayama, and other yogic relaxation or meditation techniques.

Author(s): 
Oates, Jennifer
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Dental Association (1939)

BACKGROUND: The authors compiled information on the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine, or CAM, use, as well as on reports of randomized clinical trials of CAM modalities used to treat chronic facial pain. TYPES OF STUDIES REVIEWED: The authors searched several databases for reports of clinical trials randomizing patients who had facial pain to a CAM intervention or to a control or comparison group.

Author(s): 
Myers, Cynthia D.
White, B. Alex
Heft, Marc W.
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the benefits and risks of starting anti-epileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of monotherapy in newly diagnosed partial epilepsy, and in newly diagnosed generalised epilepsy (tonic clonic type)?

Author(s): 
Marson, Anthony G.
Maguire, Melissa
Ramaratnam, Sridharan
Publication Title: 
PharmacoEconomics

Lower back pain is one of the most prevalent musculoskeletal conditions in the developed world and accounts for significant health services use.

Author(s): 
Haas, Marion
De Abreu Lourenco, Richard
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: Cancer is an important public health concern, with millions of patients affected worldwide. Given the physical, psychological, and physiologic changes associated with cancer, holistic therapies are needed to treat all aspect of the disease. DESIGN: A systematic review was conducted to determine the efficacy of yoga as a treatment option for cancer since 2010. Included studies were published from January 2010 to July 2012 and were indexed in MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Alt HealthWatch. RESULTS: Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Sharma, Manoj
Haider, Taj
Knowlden, Adam P.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Clinical Trials as Topic