Cloning, Organism

Publication Title: 
JAMA: the journal of the American Medical Association

Population projections of the aging global society and its fiscal and social impact have depended on assumptions regarding the human life span. Until now, the assumption that the maximum human life span is fixed has been justified. Recent advances in cell biology, genetics, and our understanding of the cellular processes that underlie aging, however, have shown that this assumption is invalid in a number of animal models and suggest that this assumption may become invalid for humans as well.

Author(s): 
Banks, D. A.
Fossel, M.
Publication Title: 
The Washington Post
Author(s): 
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Publication Title: 
Perspectives in Biology and Medicine
Author(s): 
Blackburn, Elizabeth
Publication Title: 
The New England Journal of Medicine
Author(s): 
Blackburn, Elizabeth
Publication Title: 
Cadernos De Saude Publica

The year 1996 witnessed the cloning of the lamb Dolly, based on the revolutionary somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technique, developed by researchers from the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland. This fact marked a relevant biotechnoscientific innovation, with probable significant consequences in the field of public health, since in principle it allows for expanding possibilities for the reproductive autonomy of infertile couples and carriers of diseases of mitochondrial origin.

Author(s): 
Schramm, F. R.
Publication Title: 
University of Toledo Law Review. University of Toledo. College of Law

This essay reviews how cloning techniques may be used for therapeutic purposes, analyzes ethical implications, and makes recommendations for public policy discourse. Although cloning may bring many potential benefits, they remain uncertain. Furthermore, human embryo research is morally problematic. Therefore, alternatives to human cloning for therapeutic aims should be sought at present. In addition to central ethical issues, public discourse should maintain an emphasis on the value of the human embryo over scientific expediency, the relativity of health, and the principle of justice.

Author(s): 
Hanson, M. J.
Publication Title: 
Theological Studies

The author presents an overview (completed on September 15, 2001) of three issues involved in the ethics of human embryonic stem cell therapy: the ethical implications of some of the scientific issues involved, the specific ethical issues of the moral standing of the early human embryo and the problem of cooperation, and a consideration of two public policy issues: should the research go forward, and what kind of health care system should the United States adopt. The author argues that the public policy questions are the most important agenda.

Author(s): 
Shannon, T. A.
Publication Title: 
Health care ethics USA: a publication of the Center for Health Care Ethics

Organizations, particularly Catholic hospitals, schools and social service agencies, should re-examine their relationships to health and medical charities promoting unethical research such as human embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning. Part 6 of the Ethical and Religious Directives provides a helpful framework for ethical analysis and action.

Author(s): 
Brehany, John
Publication Title: 
Developing World Bioethics

One effect of late capitalism--the commodification of practically everything--is to knock down the Chinese walls between the natural and productive realms, to use a Marxist framework. Women's labour in egg extraction and 'surrogate' motherhood might then be seen as what it is, labour which produces something of value. But this does not necessarily mean that women will benefit from the commodification of practically everything, in either North or South.

Author(s): 
Dickenson, Donna
Publication Title: 
BMC microbiology

BACKGROUND: Obesity induced by a high-caloric diet has previously been associated with changes in the gut microbiota in mice and in humans. In this study, pigs were cloned to minimize genetic and biological variation among the animals with the aim of developing a controlled metabolomic model suitable for a diet-intervention study. Cloning of pigs may be an attractive way to reduce genetic influences when investigating the effect of diet and obesity on different physiological sites.

Author(s): 
Pedersen, Rebecca
Andersen, Anders Daniel
Mølbak, Lars
Stagsted, Jan
Boye, Mette
Subscribe to RSS - Cloning, Organism