Cohort Studies

Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: To measure changes in the quadriceps femoris angle (Q-angle) after the insertion of full-length flexible orthotics. SETTING: Outpatient health center of Logan College of Chiropractic. SUBJECTS: A total of 40 male subjects were included in the study population. The selected population all demonstrated bilateral pes planus or hyperpronation syndrome. DESIGN: Before-after trial. METHOD: A cohort demonstrating bilateral hyperpronation was recruited. The subjects were cast according to standard protocols provided by the manufacturer.

Author(s): 
Kuhn, D. Robert
Yochum, Terry R.
Cherry, Anton R.
Rodgers, Sean S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

BACKGROUND: Recent epidemiologic studies have estimated that the lifetime prevalence of low back pain (LBP) in children is approximately 50%, with almost 15% of children experiencing frequent or continual pain. A literature search revealed no published studies addressing conservative treatment of childhood LBP. OBJECTIVE: To describe chiropractic management of LBP in patients between the ages of 4 and 18 years, as well as outcomes and factors associated with the outcomes.

Author(s): 
Hayden, Jill A.
Mior, Silvano A.
Verhoef, Marja J.
Publication Title: 
Spine

STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective and prospective cohort. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness of occupational intervention, early intervention, and standard care in the management of Worker's Compensation injury claims. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The current management of occupational back pain and work-related upper extremity disorders with either standard care or early intervention appears to be ineffective.

Author(s): 
Lemstra, Mark
Olszynski, W. P.
Publication Title: 
Spine

STUDY DESIGN: Four strata of randomly selected health care providers in North Carolina (primary care MDs, Doctors of Chiropractic, orthopedic surgeons, and group model HMO primary care providers) enrolled 1633 consecutive patients with low back pain into a cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether race had an independent effect on rate of recovery from low back pain, and whether there was any racial disparity in the treatments provided to patients with low back pain.

Author(s): 
Carey, Timothy S.
Garrett, Joanne Mills
Publication Title: 
Journal of the Neurological Sciences

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies have become increasingly popular and are used regularly by patients with chronic neurological disorders. The prevalence and characteristics of CAM use by patients with peripheral neuropathy is unknown. We performed a prospective, questionnaire-based study to determine the prevalence and patterns of use of CAM therapies in 180 consecutive outpatients with peripheral neuropathy. The use of CAM was reported by 77 patients (43%) with neuropathy.

Author(s): 
Brunelli, Brian
Gorson, Kenneth C.
Publication Title: 
Spine

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. OBJECTIVES: To determine the characteristics of patients who take muscle relaxants for back pain after seeking care and to determine the relationship of muscle relaxant use with recovery from the episode of low back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Low back pain is a common condition with a generally favorable short-term prognosis. Physicians in the acute setting commonly prescribe muscle relaxants. The indications for use and outcomes are not clear.

Author(s): 
Bernstein, Eric
Carey, Timothy S.
Garrett, Joanne Mills
Publication Title: 
Spine

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, single-cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To determine the relative sensitivity of a range of outcome measures used in evaluating treatment interventions in patients with neck pain and the magnitude of change scores on the neck Bournemouth Questionnaire and the cutoff score on the Patients' Global Impression of Change scale associated with clinically significant improvement.

Author(s): 
Bolton, Jennifer E.
Publication Title: 
Spine

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective follow-up. OBJECTIVE: To describe the 5-year clinical course in a cohort of patients treated for back or neck pain in primary care and compare results with the 1-year outcome both for the whole group and for subgroups. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: A randomized study showed a decrease in perceived pain and disability after treatment by chiropractic or physiotherapy, but many reported recurrence or continual pain at the 1-year follow-up. Knowledge of the clinical course over longer follow-up periods is limited.

Author(s): 
Enthoven, Paul
Skargren, Elisabeth
Oberg, Birgitta
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to measure the selection effects of the inclusion of a chiropractic benefit on a managed care health plan. DESIGN: An analysis of enrollment data from a managed care health plan over a 4-year period was conducted. Employers could select the managed care plan with or without a chiropractic care benefit. Comparisons of demographic and comorbid characteristics were made between employees who had the chiropractic benefit and those who did not, and between individuals who self-selected chiropractic care and those who self-selected medical care.

Author(s): 
Nelson, Craig F.
Metz, R. Douglas
LaBrot, Thomas M.
Pelletier, Kenneth R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the National Medical Association

PURPOSE: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among ethnic minority populations is poorly understood. We sought to examine CAM use in Hispanics, non-Hispanic blacks and non-Hispanic whites. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Alternative Health Supplement to the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), including information on 19 different CAM therapies used in the past 12 months. RESULTS: An estimated 34% of Hispanic, non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white adults in the United States used at least one CAM therapy (excluding prayer) during the prior 12 months (2002).

Author(s): 
Graham, Robert E.
Ahn, Andrew C.
Davis, Roger B.
O'Connor, Bonnie B.
Eisenberg, David M.
Phillips, Russell S.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Cohort Studies