Commiphora

Publication Title: 
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics

The present study was undertaken to gain insights into the molecular mechanism of cell death (apoptosis) by guggulsterone, a constituent of Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, using PC-3 human prostate cancer cells as a model. The viability of PC-3 cells, but not a normal prostate epithelial cell line (PrEC), was reduced significantly on treatment with guggulsterone in a concentration-dependent manner.

Author(s): 
Singh, Shivendra V.
Zeng, Yan
Xiao, Dong
Vogel, Victor G.
Nelson, Joel B.
Dhir, Rajiv
Tripathi, Yamini B.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

Guggulsterone, a constituent of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, causes apoptosis in cancer cells but the sequence of events leading to cell death is poorly understood. We now show that guggulsterone-induced cell death in human prostate cancer cells is caused by reactive oxygen intermediate (ROI)-dependent activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK).

Author(s): 
Singh, Shivendra V.
Choi, Sunga
Zeng, Yan
Hahm, Eun-Ryeong
Xiao, Dong
Publication Title: 
Journal of Biosciences

Myrrh (guggulu) oleoresin from the Commiphora mukul tree is an important component of antiarthritic drugs in Ayurvedic medicine. Clinical data suggest that elevated levels of hyaluronidase and collagenase type 2 enzymes contribute significantly to cartilage degradation. Triphala guggulu (TG) is a guggulu-based formulation used for the treatment of arthritis. We assessed the chondroprotective potential of TG by examining its effects on the activities of pure hyaluronidase and collagenase type 2 enzymes.

Author(s): 
Sumantran, Venil N.
Kulkarni, Asavari A.
Harsulkar, Abhay
Wele, Asmita
Koppikar, Soumya J.
Chandwaskar, Rucha
Gaire, Vishakha
Dalvi, Madhuri
Wagh, Ulhas V.
Publication Title: 
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics

Our previous studies have shown that z-guggulsterone, a constituent of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, inhibits the growth of human prostate cancer cells by causing apoptosis. We now report a novel response to z-guggulsterone involving the inhibition of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. The z-guggulsterone treatment inhibited capillary-like tube formation (in vitro neovascularization) by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and migration by HUVEC and DU145 human prostate cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner.

Author(s): 
Xiao, Dong
Singh, Shivendra V.
Publication Title: 
Anticancer Research

Identification of active principles and their molecular targets from traditional medicine is an enormous opportunity for modern drug development. Gum resin from Commiphora wightii (syn C. mukul) has been used for centuries in Ayurveda to treat internal tumors, obesity, liver disorders, malignant sores and ulcers, urinary complaints, intestinal worms, leucoderma (vitiligo), sinuses, edema and sudden paralytic seizures. Guggulsterone has been identified as one of the major active components of this gum resin.

Author(s): 
Shishodia, Shishir
Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.
Dass, Suchismita
Ramawat, Krishan G.
Aggarwal, Bharat B.
Publication Title: 
Molecular Pharmacology

Gugulipid (GL), extract of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, has been used to treat a variety of ailments. We report an anticancer effect and mechanism of GL against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with GL significantly inhibited the viability of human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and its androgen-independent variant (C81) with an IC(50) of ∼1 μM (24-h treatment), at pharmacologically relevant concentrations standardized to its major active constituent z-guggulsterone.

Author(s): 
Xiao, Dong
Zeng, Yan
Prakash, Lakshmi
Badmaev, Vladmir
Majeed, Muhammed
Singh, Shivendra V.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Prevention Research (Philadelphia, Pa.)

Chemoprevention of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), a disease associated with high mortality rates and frequent occurrence of second primary tumor (SPT), is an important clinical goal. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 signaling pathway is known to play a key role in HNSCC growth, survival, and prognosis, thereby serving as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of HNSCC.

Author(s): 
Leeman-Neill, Rebecca J.
Seethala, Raja R.
Singh, Shivendra V.
Freilino, Maria L.
Bednash, Joseph S.
Thomas, Sufi M.
Panahandeh, Mary C.
Gooding, William E.
Joyce, Sonali C.
Lingen, Mark W.
Neill, Daniel B.
Grandis, Jennifer R.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: z-Guggulsterone (z-Gug) and Gugulipid (GL) have been used to treat a variety of ailments. We now report their anti-cancer effect and mechanism against human breast cancer. METHODS: Using the human estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) and triple-negative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells as well as the normal human mammary epithelial cell line (HMEC), we evaluated the anti-breast-cancer efficacy and apoptosis inducing activity of GL. We determined the cellular and molecular mechanism of GL-inhibited breast cancer cell growth.

Author(s): 
Jiang, Guoqin
Xiao, Xiao
Zeng, Yan
Nagabhushanam, Kalyanam
Majeed, Muhammed
Xiao, Dong
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

CONTEXT: Ayurveda, the traditional system of healthcare in India, has many remedies for Osteoarthritis (OA). One of the ingredients most commonly found in Ayurvedic arthritis formulas is guggul, an oleoresin of the herb Commiphora mukul (CM). The authors have conducted both preclinical and clinical investigations of guggul for reduction of pain, stiffness, and improved function, and to determine tolerability in older patients with a diagnosis of OA of the knee. METHODS: The study was conducted using an outcome, quasi-experimental, model.

Author(s): 
Singh, Betsy B.
Mishra, Lakshmi C.
Vinjamury, Sivarama Prasad
Aquilina, Nanette
Singh, Vijay J.
Shepard, Neil
Publication Title: 
Annual Review of Nutrition

The resin of the Commiphora mukul tree has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for more than 2000 years to treat a variety of ailments. Studies in both animal models and humans have shown that this resin, termed gum guggul, can decrease elevated lipid levels. The stereoisomers E- and Z-guggulsterone have been identified as the active agents in this resin. Recent studies have shown that these compounds are antagonist ligands for the bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is an important regulator of cholesterol homeostasis.

Author(s): 
Urizar, Nancy L.
Moore, David D.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Commiphora