Commiphora

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the scientific evidence on guggul for hyperlipidemia including expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing. METHODS: Electronic searches were conducted in nine databases, 20 additional journals (not indexed in common databases), and bibliographies from 50 selected secondary references. No restrictions were placed on language or quality of publications.

Author(s): 
Ulbricht, Catherine
Basch, Ethan
Szapary, Philippe
Hammerness, Paul
Axentsev, Serguei
Boon, Heather
Kroll, David
Garraway, Levi
Vora, Mamta
Woods, Jen
Natural Standard Research Collaboration
Publication Title: 
Journal of Biosciences

Myrrh (guggulu) oleoresin from the Commiphora mukul tree is an important component of antiarthritic drugs in Ayurvedic medicine. Clinical data suggest that elevated levels of hyaluronidase and collagenase type 2 enzymes contribute significantly to cartilage degradation. Triphala guggulu (TG) is a guggulu-based formulation used for the treatment of arthritis. We assessed the chondroprotective potential of TG by examining its effects on the activities of pure hyaluronidase and collagenase type 2 enzymes.

Author(s): 
Sumantran, Venil N.
Kulkarni, Asavari A.
Harsulkar, Abhay
Wele, Asmita
Koppikar, Soumya J.
Chandwaskar, Rucha
Gaire, Vishakha
Dalvi, Madhuri
Wagh, Ulhas V.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England)

We describe a patient with depression who was well controlled with sertraline monotherapy developing two relapses of depression in close temporal relationship with starting ayurvedic herbal mixtures. We discuss the possibility of a pharmacokinetic herb-drug interaction decreasing the therapeutic efficacy of sertraline leading to the relapses of depression. We speculate the herbal plant most likely to be responsible for this interaction is either Terminalia chebula or Commiphora wighteii.

Author(s): 
Prasad, K. P. R. C.
Tharangani, P. G. D.
Samaranayake, C. N.
Publication Title: 
African journal of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicines: AJTCAM

BACKGROUND: The present study compares the protective properties of aqueous extracts of six medicinal plants, Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula (black and yellow), Terminalia arjuna, Balsamodendron Mukul and Alium sativum against lipid per-oxidation in mice brain. METHODS: The antioxidant activities were analyzed by lipid per-oxidation assay, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical assay, total antioxidant activity and metal chelation.

Author(s): 
Khan, Asmatullah
Nazar, Halima
Sabir, Syed Mubashar
Irshad, Muhammad
Awan, Shahid Iqbal
Abbas, Rizwan
Akram, Muhammad
Khaliq, Abdul
Rocha, João Batista Texeira
Ahmad, Syed Dilnawaz
Malik, Farnaz
Publication Title: 
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics

The present study was undertaken to gain insights into the molecular mechanism of cell death (apoptosis) by guggulsterone, a constituent of Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, using PC-3 human prostate cancer cells as a model. The viability of PC-3 cells, but not a normal prostate epithelial cell line (PrEC), was reduced significantly on treatment with guggulsterone in a concentration-dependent manner.

Author(s): 
Singh, Shivendra V.
Zeng, Yan
Xiao, Dong
Vogel, Victor G.
Nelson, Joel B.
Dhir, Rajiv
Tripathi, Yamini B.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

Guggulsterone, a constituent of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, causes apoptosis in cancer cells but the sequence of events leading to cell death is poorly understood. We now show that guggulsterone-induced cell death in human prostate cancer cells is caused by reactive oxygen intermediate (ROI)-dependent activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK).

Author(s): 
Singh, Shivendra V.
Choi, Sunga
Zeng, Yan
Hahm, Eun-Ryeong
Xiao, Dong
Publication Title: 
Journal of Biosciences

Myrrh (guggulu) oleoresin from the Commiphora mukul tree is an important component of antiarthritic drugs in Ayurvedic medicine. Clinical data suggest that elevated levels of hyaluronidase and collagenase type 2 enzymes contribute significantly to cartilage degradation. Triphala guggulu (TG) is a guggulu-based formulation used for the treatment of arthritis. We assessed the chondroprotective potential of TG by examining its effects on the activities of pure hyaluronidase and collagenase type 2 enzymes.

Author(s): 
Sumantran, Venil N.
Kulkarni, Asavari A.
Harsulkar, Abhay
Wele, Asmita
Koppikar, Soumya J.
Chandwaskar, Rucha
Gaire, Vishakha
Dalvi, Madhuri
Wagh, Ulhas V.
Publication Title: 
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics

Our previous studies have shown that z-guggulsterone, a constituent of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, inhibits the growth of human prostate cancer cells by causing apoptosis. We now report a novel response to z-guggulsterone involving the inhibition of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. The z-guggulsterone treatment inhibited capillary-like tube formation (in vitro neovascularization) by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and migration by HUVEC and DU145 human prostate cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner.

Author(s): 
Xiao, Dong
Singh, Shivendra V.
Publication Title: 
Anticancer Research

Identification of active principles and their molecular targets from traditional medicine is an enormous opportunity for modern drug development. Gum resin from Commiphora wightii (syn C. mukul) has been used for centuries in Ayurveda to treat internal tumors, obesity, liver disorders, malignant sores and ulcers, urinary complaints, intestinal worms, leucoderma (vitiligo), sinuses, edema and sudden paralytic seizures. Guggulsterone has been identified as one of the major active components of this gum resin.

Author(s): 
Shishodia, Shishir
Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.
Dass, Suchismita
Ramawat, Krishan G.
Aggarwal, Bharat B.
Publication Title: 
Molecular Pharmacology

Gugulipid (GL), extract of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, has been used to treat a variety of ailments. We report an anticancer effect and mechanism of GL against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with GL significantly inhibited the viability of human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and its androgen-independent variant (C81) with an IC(50) of ∼1 μM (24-h treatment), at pharmacologically relevant concentrations standardized to its major active constituent z-guggulsterone.

Author(s): 
Xiao, Dong
Zeng, Yan
Prakash, Lakshmi
Badmaev, Vladmir
Majeed, Muhammed
Singh, Shivendra V.

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