Community Health Planning

Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Catholic healthcare's mission is keeping people healthy, and providers must listen closely to determine their needs in these fast-paced, stressful times. In a society preoccupied with technology and acute care, which has the least overall impact on people's health, providers must implement more preventive strategies. The shift to promoting community health will require diverse, creative approaches. Catholic facilities must offer holistic healing, becoming community resources for children and the elderly.

Author(s): 
Ryan, M. J.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

The three original founding healthcare systems and 10 sponsoring religious institutes of Catholic Health Initiatives (CHI) have developed an unprecedented governance model to support their vision of a national Catholic health ministry in the twenty-first century. The new organization spans 22 states; annual revenues exceed $4.7 billion. Religious institutes choose either active or honorary status before consolidating with CHI, depending on their desired involvement in the organization. Currently, nine are active and two are honorary.

Author(s): 
Poe, J. E.
Publication Title: 
World Hospitals and Health Services: The Official Journal of the International Hospital Federation

In Sub-Saharan Africa private voluntary health care providers are mostly Church-related or social not for profit organizations. They provide between 40% and 60% of health care services. In the context of Health Care Reforms, the World Bank and others have (re)discovered these non governmental providers. The World Bank document 'Better Health for Africa', promotes prominent roles for them in the execution of basic package of services and public health tasks. Unfortunately, the World Bank does not outline clearly how these roles should be achieved.

Author(s): 
Verhallen, M.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

In an interview with Health Progress, Sr. Patricia A. Eck, DBS, and Christopher M Carney, respectively the chairperson of the board and president/chief executive officer of Bon Secours Health System, Inc. (BSHSI), Marriotsville, MD, talked about their system, the Catholic health ministry, and not-for-profit healthcare in general. BSHSI is sponsored by the Congregation of Bon Secours, which was founded in Paris in 1824 to provide home healthcare for the poor.

Author(s): 
Eck, P. A.
Carney, C. M.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

In 1988, with the publication of Catholic Health Ministry: A New Vision for a New Century, the Commission on Catholic Health Care Ministry called on the Church to redefine its healing mission in society. Unfortunately, despite various efforts, the Church has not yet fully articulated a shared vision of Catholic healthcare, healing, and support. Healing human brokenness has always been the Church's work in the world, whether the brokenness be physical, emotional, intellectual, moral, or spiritual.

Author(s): 
Fahey, C. J.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

The relationship between Catholic Social Services (CSS) of the Diocese of Scranton and Mercy Health Partners--Northeast Region, which joined forces last year to develop a senior support network for residents of Wilkes-Barre and the Borough of Kingston, PA, illustrates how collaboration grows out of cooperation and coordination of services. The network is a project of the Neighborhood-Based Senior Care National Initiative, which works to develop collaborations between Catholic health systems and Catholic Charities agencies to help poor communities meet the needs of aging persons.

Author(s): 
Kilbourne, B.
Giguere, N.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

When challenged to demonstrate their contributions to the community, Catholic and other not-for-profit hospitals have traditionally reported the sum of their charity care, free programs, and unprofitable services. But critics of tax-exempt healthcare now say this is insufficient and ask such hospitals for descriptions of the outcomes of their contributions. There are seven basic measures for gauging outcomes: participation, mind states, behavior, health status, sickness care utilization, sickness care expenditures, and community value.

Author(s): 
MacStravic, R. S.
Publication Title: 
Profiles in Healthcare Marketing

Daniel Freeman Hospitals in in Los Angeles committed $11.2 million to its community benefits program, which includes charitable care, reimbursement shortfalls, outreach and community service programs. The Catholic hospitals are part of the Carondelet Health System. Their mission follows the example of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet who, in France in 1600, departed from the cloistered community life to go beyond the convent and care to people in their local communities.

Author(s): 
Rees, T.
Publication Title: 
Public Health Nursing (Boston, Mass.)

In central Massachusetts a large urban parish asked the University of Massachusetts, Amherst School of Nursing to conduct a community assessment for the church and newly employed parish nurse. The aims of the assessment were: to determine the health status of parishioners, identify their perceived health needs and perceived barriers in meeting those needs, and to assist the church and parish nurse in developing a health program for their faith community. Findings of the assessment are based on questionnaire and focus group data.

Author(s): 
Swinney, J.
Anson-Wonkka, C.
Maki, E.
Corneau, J.
Publication Title: 
Public Health Reports (Washington, D.C.: 1974)

Community activists in Chicago believed their neighborhoods were being targeted by alcohol and tobacco outdoor advertisers, despite the Outdoor Advertising Association of America's voluntary code of principles, which claims to restrict the placement of ads for age-restricted products and prevent billboard saturation of urban neighborhoods. A research and action plan resulted from a 10-year collaborative partnership among Loyola University Chicago, the American Lung Association of Metropolitan Chicago (ALAMC), and community activists from a predominately African American church, St.

Author(s): 
Hackbarth, D. P.
Schnopp-Wyatt, D.
Katz, D.
Williams, J.
Silvestri, B.
Pfleger, M.

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