Community Health Workers

Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Lay health workers (LHWs) perform functions related to healthcare delivery, receive some level of training, but have no formal professional or paraprofessional certificate or tertiary education degree. They provide care for a range of issues, including maternal and child health. For LHW programmes to be effective, we need a better understanding of the factors that influence their success and sustainability.

Author(s): 
Glenton, Claire
Colvin, Christopher J.
Carlsen, Benedicte
Swartz, Alison
Lewin, Simon
Noyes, Jane
Rashidian, Arash
Publication Title: 
Revista De Saude Publica

OBJECTIVE: To describe community health workers' attitudes and beliefs toward the elderly. METHODS: Cross-sectional descriptive study conducted in with 213 community health workers (CHWs) at 12 primary care units and 29 family health centers in the city of MarÌlia, State of S„o Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010. Data were collected by means of a sociodemographic questionnaire, a scale of attitudes toward aging (Neri Scale), and a questionnaire to assess gerontological knowledge (the Palmore-Neri-Cachioni Aging Quiz). The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences v.

Author(s): 
Ferreira, VirgÌlio Moraes
Ruiz, Tania
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease: The Official Journal of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease

SETTING: The Northern Cape province, Republic of South Africa. OBJECTIVES: To explore factors that motivate lay volunteers to join tuberculosis (TB) control programmes in high burden but resource-limited settings. DESIGN: A qualitative study consisting of three focus group discussions and a documentary review of the records of 347 lay volunteers involved in the tuberculosis programme in the Northern Cape province of South Africa. Additional data were also collected in a cross-sectional study that involved questionnaire interviews with 135 lay volunteers.

Author(s): 
Kironde, S.
Klaasen, S.
Publication Title: 
African Health Sciences

The current global tuberculosis (TB) epidemic has pressured health care managers, particularly in developing countries, to seek for alternative, innovative ways of delivering effective treatment to the large number of TB patients diagnosed annually. One strategy employed is direct observation of treatment (DOT) for all patients. In high-burden settings innovation with this strategy has resulted into the use of lay community members to supervise TB patients during the duration of anti-TB treatment. However, community involvement in health programmes is not a simple matter.

Author(s): 
Kironde, Samson
Bajunirwe, Francis
Publication Title: 
African Journal of Health Sciences

The main objective was to determine motivating factors for community care givers (CCGs), the services they provided to the community, and to identify sources of CCGs' material supplies. A cross sectional qualitative study was done using in-depth key informant interviews with community cares givers and traditional leaders. Analysis was based on themes utilizing content analysis. Most of the CCGs were housewives. Intrinsic motivating factors included feelings of empathy, altruism and religious convictions.

Author(s): 
Mkandawire, Wanangwa C.
Muula, Adamson S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health

Community health workers (CHWs) are an important element of many health systems and programmes for the promotion and delivery of a wide range of health interventions and disease surveillance. Understanding the motivation and retention of CHWs is recognized as essential but there are few data from sub-Saharan Africa.

Author(s): 
Dil, Yasemin
Strachan, Daniel
Cairncross, Sandy
Korkor, Andrew Seidu
Hill, Zelee
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Lay health workers (LHWs) perform functions related to healthcare delivery, receive some level of training, but have no formal professional or paraprofessional certificate or tertiary education degree. They provide care for a range of issues, including maternal and child health. For LHW programmes to be effective, we need a better understanding of the factors that influence their success and sustainability.

Author(s): 
Glenton, Claire
Colvin, Christopher J.
Carlsen, Benedicte
Swartz, Alison
Lewin, Simon
Noyes, Jane
Rashidian, Arash
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Lay involvement in public health programmes occurs through formalised lay health worker (LHW) and other volunteer roles. Whether such participation should be supported, or indeed rewarded, by payment is a critical question. With reference to policy in England, UK, this paper argues how framing citizen involvement in health only as time freely given does not account for the complexities of practice, nor intrinsic motivations. The paper reports results on payment drawn from a study of approaches to support lay people in public health roles, conducted in England, 2007-9.

Author(s): 
South, Jane
Purcell, Martin E.
Branney, Peter
Gamsu, Mark
White, Judy
Publication Title: 
Human Resources for Health

BACKGROUND: In 2012, the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW), Tanzania, approved national guidelines and training materials for community health workers (CHWs) in integrated maternal, newborn and child health (Integrated MNCH), with CHWs trained and deployed across five districts of Morogoro Region soon after. To inform future scale up, this study assessed motivation and satisfaction among these CHWs. METHODS: A survey of all CHWs trained by the Integrated MNCH Programme was conducted in the last quarter of 2013.

Author(s): 
Mpembeni, Rose N. M.
Bhatnagar, Aarushi
LeFevre, Amnesty
Chitama, Dereck
Urassa, David P.
Kilewo, Charles
Mdee, Rebecca M.
Semu, Helen
Winch, Peter J.
Killewo, Japhet
Baqui, Abdullah H.
George, Asha
Publication Title: 
BMC public health

BACKGROUND: Malaria is a serious illness among children aged 5 years and below in Zambia, which carries with it many adverse effects including anemia and high parasites exposure that lead to infant and childhood mortality. Due to poor accessibility to modern health facilities, malaria is normally managed at home using indigenous and cosmopolitan medicines.

Author(s): 
Kaona, Frederick A. D.
Tuba, Mary

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