complementary medicine

Publication Title: 
Schmerz (Berlin, Germany)

BACKGROUND: The regular update of the guidelines on fibromyalgia syndrome, AWMF number 145/004, was scheduled for April 2017. METHODS: The guidelines were developed by 13 scientific societies and 2 patient self-help organizations coordinated by the German Pain Society. Working groups (n =8) with a total of 42 members were formed balanced with respect to gender, medical expertise, position in the medical or scientific hierarchy and potential conflicts of interest.

Author(s): 
Langhorst, J.
Heldmann, P.
Henningsen, P.
Kopke, K.
Krumbein, L.
Lucius, H.
Winkelmann, A.
Wolf, B.
Häuser, W.
Publication Title: 
Electronic Physician

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic digestive disorder, which is characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea and constipation periods. The etiology is unknown. Based on the different mechanisms in the etiology, treatment focuses on controlling symptoms. Due to the longtime of syndrome, inadequacy of current treatments, financial burden for patients and pharmacologic effects, several patients have turned to the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

Author(s): 
Bahrami, Hamid Reza
Hamedi, Shokouhsadat
Salari, Roshanak
Noras, Mohammadreza
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess whether quality of life (QOL) improved in cancer survivors who had undertaken a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) intervention, compared to cancer survivors who had not. METHODS: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was undertaken. Electronic databases including MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, EMBASE, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched from 1990 to 2012. Search terms incorporating the concepts of cancer survivors, QOL and various types of CAM were used.

Author(s): 
Shneerson, Catherine
Taskila, Taina
Gale, Nicola
Greenfield, Sheila
Chen, Yen-Fu
Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing

BACKGROUND: Introducing patients with cancer to the practice of yoga can be beneficial for coping with the side effects of treatment and the psychological aspects of cancer that are often difficult and distressing for patients. Oncology nurses can learn to use simple yoga techniques for themselves and as interventions with their patients. OBJECTIVES: This article provides details about the development and implementation of a yoga class for patients with cancer and provides details about other ways nurses can integrate yoga into oncology nursing and cancer care.

Author(s): 
Sisk, Angela
Fonteyn, Marsha
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: To identify the content and reporting details of randomised controlled trials of yoga for musculoskeletal conditions through a systematic review of the literature. DESIGN: Twenty electronic databases were searched to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions. Eligibility criteria were full-text, peer reviewed articles, of RCTs with yoga as a primary intervention, on a population aged 18 years and over, with a clinical diagnosis of a musculoskeletal condition.

Author(s): 
Ward, Lesley
Stebbings, Simon
Cherkin, Daniel
Baxter, G. David
Publication Title: 
Schmerz (Berlin, Germany)

BACKGROUND: The regular update of the guidelines on fibromyalgia syndrome, AWMF number 145/004, was scheduled for April 2017. METHODS: The guidelines were developed by 13 scientific societies and 2 patient self-help organizations coordinated by the German Pain Society. Working groups (n =8) with a total of 42 members were formed balanced with respect to gender, medical expertise, position in the medical or scientific hierarchy and potential conflicts of interest.

Author(s): 
Langhorst, J.
Heldmann, P.
Henningsen, P.
Kopke, K.
Krumbein, L.
Lucius, H.
Winkelmann, A.
Wolf, B.
Häuser, W.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess whether quality of life (QOL) improved in cancer survivors who had undertaken a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) intervention, compared to cancer survivors who had not. METHODS: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was undertaken. Electronic databases including MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, EMBASE, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched from 1990 to 2012. Search terms incorporating the concepts of cancer survivors, QOL and various types of CAM were used.

Author(s): 
Shneerson, Catherine
Taskila, Taina
Gale, Nicola
Greenfield, Sheila
Chen, Yen-Fu
Publication Title: 
BMJ open

INTRODUCTION: Chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) affects up to 50% of the world's population. It impacts negatively on quality of life; entailing high costs on our medical systems, and translates to economic burden due to work loss. Aetiology of CNCP is complex and multifactorial, embracing the somatosensory, cognitive and affective domains. Opioid analgesia and other invasive interventions are often inadequate for clinical management of CNCP. Recently, mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has become a popular therapy for various medical conditions, including CNCP.

Author(s): 
Leung, Lawrence
Han, Han
Martin, Mary
Kotecha, Jyoti
Publication Title: 
Electronic Physician

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic digestive disorder, which is characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea and constipation periods. The etiology is unknown. Based on the different mechanisms in the etiology, treatment focuses on controlling symptoms. Due to the longtime of syndrome, inadequacy of current treatments, financial burden for patients and pharmacologic effects, several patients have turned to the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

Author(s): 
Bahrami, Hamid Reza
Hamedi, Shokouhsadat
Salari, Roshanak
Noras, Mohammadreza
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess whether quality of life (QOL) improved in cancer survivors who had undertaken a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) intervention, compared to cancer survivors who had not. METHODS: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was undertaken. Electronic databases including MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, EMBASE, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched from 1990 to 2012. Search terms incorporating the concepts of cancer survivors, QOL and various types of CAM were used.

Author(s): 
Shneerson, Catherine
Taskila, Taina
Gale, Nicola
Greenfield, Sheila
Chen, Yen-Fu

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