Confidentiality

Publication Title: 
Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal

Religious discussion of human organs and tissues has concentrated largely on donation for therapeutic purposes. The retrieval and use of human tissue samples in diagnostic, research, and education contexts have, by contrast, received very little direct theological attention. Initially undertaken at the behest of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission, this essay seeks to explore the theological and religious questions embedded in nontherapeutic use of human tissue.

Author(s): 
Campbell, Courtney S.
Publication Title: 
Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin

Previous research on romantic secrecy found that hiding one's relationship from others predicted lower levels of relationship quality. The present research built on this work by exploring the potential consequences of relationship concealment on partners' commitment level and personal health. Study 1 found that greater secrecy was associated with reduced commitment to one's relationship, lower self-esteem, and more reported health symptoms. Study 2 tested a theoretical model of the effects of secrecy using structural equation modeling.

Author(s): 
Lehmiller, Justin J.
Publication Title: 
Developing World Bioethics

In a prior issue of Developing World Bioethics, Cheryl Macpherson and Ruth Macklin critically engaged with an article of mine, where I articulated a moral theory grounded on indigenous values salient in the sub-Saharan region, and then applied it to four major issues in bioethics, comparing and contrasting its implications with those of the dominant Western moral theories, utilitarianism and Kantianism.

Author(s): 
Metz, Thaddeus
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

Arguments are advanced, on a pragmatic basis, for preferring a 'situational' approach to medical ethical problems, rather than an approach based on any one of the dogmatic formulations on offer. The consequences of such a preference are exemplified in relation to confidentiality; and in relation to the ethical dilemmas which surround the beginning and the end of terrestrial human life.

Author(s): 
Black, D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

Arguments are advanced, on a pragmatic basis, for preferring a 'situational' approach to medical ethical problems, rather than an approach based on any one of the dogmatic formulations on offer. The consequences of such a preference are exemplified in relation to confidentiality; and in relation to the ethical dilemmas which surround the beginning and the end of terrestrial human life.

Author(s): 
Black, D.
Publication Title: 
Roczniki Panstwowego Zakladu Higieny

BACKGROUND: The health system responsiveness, defined as non-medical aspect of treatment relating to the protection of the patients' legitimate rights, is the intrinsic goal of the WHO strategy for 21st century.

Author(s): 
Gromulska, Lucyna
Supranowicz, Piotr
Wysocki, Miros?aw Jan
Publication Title: 
Clinical Transplantation

BACKGROUND: Belgian politicians submitted a proposal to rescind the law on anonymity of organ donation and transplantation and facilitate contact between donor families and recipients. It remains uncertain if recipients support this proposal. METHODOLOGY: One liver transplant patient organization (n = 176/249) answered and provided comments on two questions: (i) how satisfied are you with the current principle of anonymity of the identity of the donor and (ii) the law about anonymity should be changed to allow the donor family and the patient to meet.

Author(s): 
Dobbels, Fabienne
Van Gelder, Frank
Remans, Kathleen
Verkinderen, Ann
Peeters, Jos
Pirenne, Jacques
Nevens, Frederik
Publication Title: 
Transplantation

BACKGROUND: In the Netherlands, anonymity of organ donation, which is currently protected by legislation, has come under discussion. In the Dutch society, a tendency to allow direct contact between transplant recipients and their donor's family is noticeable. As little is known about the opinion of Dutch liver transplant recipients on anonymity of organ donation and direct contact with the donor's family, this study examines their opinions. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 244 liver transplant recipients.

Author(s): 
Annema, Coby
Op den Dries, Sanna
van den Berg, Aad P.
Ranchor, Adelita V.
Porte, Robert J.
Publication Title: 
Transfusion

Annually, over 3000 bone marrow transplants are performed worldwide involving HLA-identical sibling donors. However, only 30 percent of those patients who need a bone marrow transplant have a matched sibling donor. Programs have been developed to provide volunteer unrelated bone marrow donors for patients without sibling donors. Because bone marrow donation requires a high level of altruism, especially on the part of a donor unrelated to the patient, it is important to determine the effect of donation on the donor.

Author(s): 
Stroncek, D.
Strand, R.
Scott, E.
Kamstra-Halvorson, L.
Halagan, N.
Rogers, G.
McCullough, J.
Publication Title: 
The Bulletin of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law

Psychotherapists' duty to protect potential victims from their patients' violence has evolved in recent years toward a narrower set of obligations. This reformulation of the duty appears to us to be consistent with a sociobiological analysis of the reasonableness of compelled altruism. Altruistic behavior (e.g., rescuing a potential victim) takes place rarely in the animal world, and even among humans usually occurs only in situations in which reciprocity is likely.

Author(s): 
Rudegeair, T. J.
Appelbaum, P. S.

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