Conflict (Psychology)

Publication Title: 
Nursing History Review: Official Journal of the American Association for the History of Nursing

This article analyzes the tensions and uneasy negotiations, based on a case study, that occurred among Catholic sisters, administrators, bishops, physicians, and the Vatican for more than seven years at a hospital in Austin, Texas. Here, the largest health care system in the city, which was Catholic, joined with the local public, tax-supported hospital that provided the majority of reproductive health care services in the region. A clash resulted over whether the hospital could continue providing sterilization and contraceptive services to its primarily poor patients.

Author(s): 
Wall, Baprbra Mann
Publication Title: 
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology

[Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 20(3) of Journal of Occupational Health Psychology (see record 2015-15847-001). There was a misspelling in the figures. The legends for Figure 1 and Figure 2 should read "High Daily Resilience".] This study among a heterogeneous sample of employees expands the Job-Demands (JD-R) theory by examining how interpersonal conflicts at work-task and relationship conflict-spillover into the nonwork domain on a daily basis.

Author(s): 
Martinez-Corts, InÈs
Demerouti, Evangelia
Bakker, Arnold B.
Boz, Marina
Publication Title: 
The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry

After giving an introductory outline of the phenomenology and theoretical aspects of the concept "love affair", the author proceeds to review a number of symptomatic love affairs arising in the lives of a series of female patients during the course of analytically oriented psychotherapy.. The material is presented in its general aspects and in the form of one detailed case history. In subsequent discussion the author attempts to explain the genesis of these love affairs in terms of phase-speciifc conflicts in the patient and certain iatrogenic aspects of the therapy.

Author(s): 
Christie, G. L.
Publication Title: 
Minerva Medica

Freud saw war as the prevailing of death over love, this being a metapsychological concept whose roots lie in the dynamics of urges within the individual and civilisation in general. In his opinion, this dialectic tension could not be overcome. Reich noted that the analytic theory was in conflict with practice. Freud's premisses concerning the philosophy of civilisation and their implications have been taken up by Marcuse, who solves the conflict between the love-death urges by treating work as reduced to love or a game, in which death is merely the negative to be overcome.

Author(s): 
Comparato, S.
Publication Title: 
Psychiatrie, Neurologie, Und Medizinische Psychologie

Suicidality should not, in consideration of the present studies and the experience gained by the author, be considered a disease 'sui generis', but rather a symptom only. The etiopathogenesis of "nonpsychotic" suicidality is discussed with particular reference to the psychopathology thereof. Acts of suicide are most often part of "lasting affective reactions".

Author(s): 
Kulawik, H.
Publication Title: 
Psychiatry

THE NATURE of the relationship between those psychological processes which influence waking behavior and cognition, and those which influence the content of nocturnal dreams, is a question both interesting and unresolved. Is a person's approach to life similar in both the dream and the waking state? If someone was experiencing conflict in his life, might we expect to find conflictual situations in his dreams? And if, on the contrary, a person's waking expectations and experiences were harmonious, might we expect him to manifest conflict-free dreams?

Author(s): 
Harris, M. E.
Ray, W. J.
Publication Title: 
The Psychiatric Clinics of North America

Extramarital sexual relationships constitute one of the most common problems encountered in marital therapy. They present both of the marital partners with highly emotionally charged dilemmas that must be resolved. Once believed to occur because a married person was weak, immoral, or neurotic, they are now understood to occur because of a variety of reasons. While almost a third of these cases end in divorce, others respond to appropriate treatment so that the marriages may be maintained, although with varying degrees of happiness for these couples.

Author(s): 
Humphrey, F. G.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Psycho-Analysis

The growth of object relationships may be studied along either the developmental line of the discharge-object or that of the reflexive-object. The former is the well-known line of development from the need-satisfying object to the constant object and is a study of id-ego relationships. The developmental line of the reflexive-object, on the other hand, follows the history of the introjects and is a study of either ego-superego or ego-ego ideal relationships. It is the latter which constitutes the study of narcissism.

Author(s): 
Parkin, A.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis

Although the erotic transference is believed to be universal, it is variable in its expression. Drawing on the distinction between transference resistance and resistance to the awareness of the transference, I have proposed that, in general, the erotic transference utilized as resistance is more common among women, while resistance to the awareness of the erotic transference is more common among male patients. Erotic transference as resistance poses different analytic problems from those posed by resistance to its awareness.

Author(s): 
Person, E. S.
Publication Title: 
The Psychoanalytic Quarterly

A distinct type of phenomenon that has not been previously noted as such is named and described. Men who present a two-woman phenomenon retain a commitment to wife and marriage while loving another woman. Conflict arises only when one of the women has to be relinquished. It is postulated that many men with this pattern of loving have experienced a traumatic childhood and an oedipal conflict which defensively involved two maternal objects in fantasy or reality. One mother was hated, the other loved. This dynamic is one possible determinant leading to the two-woman phenomenon.

Author(s): 
Weiss, S. S.

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