Confucianism

Publication Title: 
Western Journal of Nursing Research

This article addresses the dilemmas of elderly Chinese women as spousal caregivers in Hong Kong in the 1990s. An in-depth ethnographic approach was used to draw on a convenience sample of 20 elderly wives who were caregivers from Hong Kong. At the conceptual level, the discussion highlights how caregiving is rooted in complex, culturally-based models of contemporary practices, sociohistoric patterns, and gender-specific obligations.

Author(s): 
Holroyd, Eleanor
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Nursing

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The paper discusses the application of the Eastern body-mind-spirit approach in healthcare practice. BACKGROUND: Traumas, sufferings and losses may induce immense distress in patients and their families, as well as apathy and exhaustion in healthcare workers. Over-specialization and compartmentalization of services may provide a convenient shelter for healthcare workers to be detached and to simply focus on a narrowly defined scope of intervention. However, the existential problems are still there.

Author(s): 
Chan, Cecilia L. W.
Ng, S. M.
Ho, Rainbow T. H.
Chow, Amy Y. M.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Science Quarterly

The classical Chinese philosophy of Confucius is here reconsidered in light of the current challenge of sustaining loving relationships not only in words but in actions, and providing a life worth living for frail older adults. The Ox Mountain Parable of Meng Tzu (Mencius) is described and linked to the nursing home reform movement known as "The Eden Alternative." Implications for nursing are considered.

Author(s): 
Baumann, Steven L.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Science Quarterly

Confucianism is one of the frequently mentioned social factors in the research of care for the older adults in East Asian countries such as China, Taiwan, Japan, and Korea. Although Confucian philosophy functions as a powerful source of reference for care, the context of care in Confucian texts is not yet largely studied in nursing. This column focuses on the meaning of care in two key Confucian texts, the Analects and Mencius. The context of care in Confucian texts should provide a sound foundation and substantial understanding for researchers studying care in East Asian society.

Author(s): 
Koh, Eun-Kang
Koh, Chin-Kang
Publication Title: 
The American journal of bioethics: AJOB

This essay explores a proper Confucian vision on genetic enhancement. It argues that while Confucians can accept a formal starting point that Michael Sandel proposes in his ethics of giftedness, namely, that children should be taken as gifts, Confucians cannot adopt his generalist strategy. The essay provides a Confucian full ethics of giftedness by addressing a series of relevant questions, such as what kind of gifts children are, where the gifts are from, in which way they are given, and for what purpose they are given.

Author(s): 
Fan, Ruiping
Publication Title: 
Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal

This essay offers a Confucian evaluation of Article 14 of the UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, with a focus given to its statement that "the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being." It indicates that "a right to health" contained in the statement is open to two different interpretations, one radically egalitarian, another a decent minimum.

Author(s): 
Fan, Ruiping
Publication Title: 
Zygon

This essay argues that Japan's resistance to the practice of transplanting organs from persons deemed "brain dead" may not be the result, as some claim, of that society's religions being not yet sufficiently expressive of love and altruism. The violence to the body necessary for the excision of transplantable organs seems to have been made acceptable to American Christians at a unique historical "window of opportunity" for acceptance of that new form of medical technology.

Author(s): 
LaFleur, William R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

This paper examines whether the modern bioethical principles of respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice proposed by Beauchamp and Childress are existent in, compatible with, or acceptable to the leading Chinese moral philosophy-the ethics of Confucius. The author concludes that the moral values which the four prima facie principles uphold are expressly identifiable in Confucius' teachings.

Author(s): 
Tsai, D. F.-C.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Economic$

Holistic nursing care is typically defined to include the assessment and support of a patient's religious background to respect his/her beliefs and promote coping with illness, rehabilitation, and/or dying. An assessment of Taiwanese hospitals reveals variation in the policies and environment supporting religious practices. The survey of nursing executives revealed that only 40% of hospitals had any facilities for religious service or prayer and only 4% employed a chaplain or recruited volunteers to provide religious support.

Author(s): 
Yin, Chang-Yi
Tzeng, Huey-Ming
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

The Confucian culture, rich in its contents and great in its significance, exerted on the thinking, culture and political life of ancient China immense influences, unparalleled by any other school of thought or culture. Confucian theories on morality and ethics, with 'goodness' as the core and 'rites' as the norm, served as the 'key notes' of the traditional medical ethics of China.

Author(s): 
Guo, Z.

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