Connective Tissue

Publication Title: 
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies

The living matrix is defined as the continuous molecular fabric of the organism, consisting of fascia, the other connective tissues, extracellular matrices, integrins, cytoskeletons, nuclear matrices and DNA. The extracellular, cellular and nuclear biopolymers or ground substances constitute a body-wide reservoir of charge that can maintain electrical homeostasis and "inflammatory preparedness" throughout the organism.

Author(s): 
Oschman, James L.
Publication Title: 
Acta Myologica: Myopathies and Cardiomyopathies: Official Journal of the Mediterranean Society of Myology / Edited by the Gaetano Conte Academy for the Study of Striated Muscle Diseases

Muscular dystrophies such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are usually approached as dysfunctions of the affected skeletal myofibres and their force transmission. Comparatively little attention has been given to the increase in connective tissue (fibrosis) which accompanies these muscular changes. Interestingly, an increase in endomysial tissue is apparent long before any muscular degeneration can be observed. Fibrosis is the result of a reactive or reparative process involving mechanical, humoral and cellular factors.

Author(s): 
Klingler, Werner
Jurkat-Rott, Karin
Lehmann-Horn, Frank
Schleip, Robert
Publication Title: 
Medical Hypotheses

Although chronic low back pain (cLBP) is increasingly recognized as a complex syndrome with multifactorial etiology, the pathogenic mechanisms leading to the development of chronic pain in this condition remain poorly understood. This article presents a new, testable pathophysiological model integrating connective tissue plasticity mechanisms with several well-developed areas of research on cLBP (pain psychology, postural control, neuroplasticity).

Author(s): 
Langevin, Helene M.
Sherman, Karen J.
Publication Title: 
Acta Myologica: Myopathies and Cardiomyopathies: Official Journal of the Mediterranean Society of Myology / Edited by the Gaetano Conte Academy for the Study of Striated Muscle Diseases

Muscular dystrophies such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are usually approached as dysfunctions of the affected skeletal myofibres and their force transmission. Comparatively little attention has been given to the increase in connective tissue (fibrosis) which accompanies these muscular changes. Interestingly, an increase in endomysial tissue is apparent long before any muscular degeneration can be observed. Fibrosis is the result of a reactive or reparative process involving mechanical, humoral and cellular factors.

Author(s): 
Klingler, Werner
Jurkat-Rott, Karin
Lehmann-Horn, Frank
Schleip, Robert
Publication Title: 
FASEB journal: official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

The mechanism of action of acupuncture remains largely unknown. The reaction to acupuncture needling known as 'de qi', widely viewed as essential to the therapeutic effect of acupuncture, may be a key to understanding its mechanism of action. De qi includes a characteristic needling sensation, perceived by the patient, and 'needle grasp' perceived by the acupuncturist. During needle grasp, the acupuncturist feels pulling and increased resistance to further movement of the inserted needle.

Author(s): 
Langevin, H. M.
Churchill, D. L.
Cipolla, M. J.
Publication Title: 
The Anatomical Record

Acupuncture meridians traditionally are believed to constitute channels connecting the surface of the body to internal organs. We hypothesize that the network of acupuncture points and meridians can be viewed as a representation of the network formed by interstitial connective tissue. This hypothesis is supported by ultrasound images showing connective tissue cleavage planes at acupuncture points in normal human subjects. To test this hypothesis, we mapped acupuncture points in serial gross anatomical sections through the human arm.

Author(s): 
Langevin, Helene M.
Yandow, Jason A.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Acupuncture points and meridians are commonly believed to possess unique electrical properties. The experimental support for this claim is limited given the technical and methodological shortcomings of prior studies. Recent studies indicate a correspondence between acupuncture meridians and connective tissue planes.

Author(s): 
Ahn, Andrew C.
Wu, Junru
Badger, Gary J.
Hammerschlag, Richard
Langevin, Helene M.
Publication Title: 
BMC systems biology

BACKGROUND: In humans, connective tissue forms a complex, interconnected network throughout the body that may have mechanosensory, regulatory and signaling functions. Understanding these potentially important phenomena requires non-invasive measurements of collagen network structure that can be performed in live animals or humans. The goal of this study was to show that ultrasound can be used to quantify dynamic changes in local connective tissue structure in vivo.

Author(s): 
Langevin, Helene M.
Rizzo, Donna M.
Fox, James R.
Badger, Gary J.
Wu, Junru
Konofagou, Elisa E.
Stevens-Tuttle, Debbie
Bouffard, Nicole A.
Krag, Martin H.
Publication Title: 
BMC musculoskeletal disorders

BACKGROUND: Although the connective tissues forming the fascial planes of the back have been hypothesized to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic low back pain (LBP), there have been no previous studies quantitatively evaluating connective tissue structure in this condition. The goal of this study was to perform an ultrasound-based comparison of perimuscular connective tissue structure in the lumbar region in a group of human subjects with chronic or recurrent LBP for more than 12 months, compared with a group of subjects without LBP.

Author(s): 
Langevin, Helene M.
Stevens-Tuttle, Debbie
Fox, James R.
Badger, Gary J.
Bouffard, Nicole A.
Krag, Martin H.
Wu, Junru
Henry, Sharon M.
Publication Title: 
Histochemistry and Cell Biology

Studies in cultured cells have shown that nuclear shape is an important factor influencing nuclear function, and that mechanical forces applied to the cell can directly affect nuclear shape. In a previous study, we demonstrated that stretching of whole mouse subcutaneous tissue causes dynamic cytoskeletal remodeling with perinuclear redistribution of alpha-actin in fibroblasts within the tissue. We have further shown that the nuclei of these fibroblasts have deep invaginations containing alpha-actin.

Author(s): 
Langevin, Helene M.
Storch, Kirsten N.
Snapp, Robert R.
Bouffard, Nicole A.
Badger, Gary J.
Howe, Alan K.
Taatjes, Douglas J.

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