Consciousness

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Meditative techniques are sought frequently by patients coping with medical and psychological problems. Because of their increasingly widespread appeal and use, and the potential for use as medical therapies, a concise and thorough review of the current state of scientific knowledge of these practices as medical interventions was conducted. PURPOSE: To systematically review the evidence supporting efficacy and safety of meditative practices in treating illnesses, and examine areas warranting further study. Studies on normal healthy populations are not included.

Author(s): 
Arias, Albert J.
Steinberg, Karen
Banga, Alok
Trestman, Robert L.
Publication Title: 
Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

Surveys have demonstrated that complementary medicine use for depression is widespread, although patterns of use vary. A series of systematic reviews provide a summary of the current evidence for acupuncture, aromatherapy and massage, homeopathy, meditation, reflexology, herbal medicine, yoga, and several dietary supplements and relaxation techniques. The quantity and quality of individual studies vary widely, but research interest in complementary therapies is increasing, particularly in herbal and nutritional products.

Author(s): 
Pilkington, Karen
Rampes, Hagen
Richardson, Janet
Publication Title: 
WMJ: official publication of the State Medical Society of Wisconsin

The majority of studies on Tai Chi conducted between 1996 and 2004 had focused on health and well being of Tai Chi exercise for senior adults. The results show that Tai Chi may lead to improved balance, reduced fear of falling, increased strength, increased functional mobility, greater flexibility, and increased psychological well-being, sleep enhancement for sleep disturbed elderly individuals, and increased cardio functioning.

Author(s): 
Kuramoto, Alice M.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this investigation was to explore the effectiveness of search strategies developed to identify trials of specific complementary therapies in a range of clinical conditions. DESIGN: All primary studies included in a series of systematic reviews were identified. An analysis of the original source of the study and search term(s) by means of which the study had originally been retrieved was carried out. Each study was then searched for in each of 6 databases (AMED, Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO).

Author(s): 
Pilkington, Karen
Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a structured review of eight mind-body interventions for older adults with chronic nonmalignant pain. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and evidence for pain reduction in older adults with chronic nonmalignant pain in the following mind-body therapies: biofeedback, progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, guided imagery, hypnosis, tai chi, qi gong, and yoga. METHODS: Relevant studies in the MEDLINE, PsycINFO, AMED, and CINAHL databases were located. A manual search of references from retrieved articles was also conducted.

Author(s): 
Morone, Natalia E.
Greco, Carol M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing: Official Journal of the American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses

Complementary and alternative therapies have enjoyed increasingly widespread use in recent years. Because of this trend, we were eager to obtain a better grasp on the actual number of people in our hospital's pain clinic who have used these modalities. In an effort to explore the use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) by patients seen in an anesthesiology chronic pain clinic, we conducted a study using a questionnaire. This questionnaire contained two sections, one covering complementary/alternative modalities and the other dealing with herbals or nutraceuticals.

Author(s): 
Konvicka, James J.
Meyer, Tricia A.
McDavid, Andrew J.
Roberson, Charles R.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Hypertension

BACKGROUND: Prior clinical trials suggest that the Transcendental Meditation technique may decrease blood pressure of normotensive and hypertensive individuals but study-quality issues have been raised. This study was designed to assess effects of Transcendental Meditation on blood pressure using objective quality assessments and meta-analyses. METHODS: PubMed and Cochrane databases through December 2006 and collected publications on Transcendental Meditation were searched.

Author(s): 
Anderson, James W.
Liu, Chunxu
Kryscio, Richard J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing: JOGNN

OBJECTIVE: To examine published evidence on the effectiveness of mind-body interventions during pregnancy on perceived stress, mood, and perinatal outcomes. DATA SOURCES: Computerized searches of PubMed, Cinahl, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library. STUDY SELECTION: Twelve out of 64 published intervention studies between 1980 and February 2007 of healthy, adult pregnant women met criteria for review. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Studies were categorized by type of mind-body modality used. Progressive muscle relaxation was the most common intervention.

Author(s): 
Beddoe, Amy E.
Lee, Kathryn A.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity

BACKGROUND: Worldwide, the prevalence of obesity among children has increased dramatically. Although the etiology of childhood obesity is multifactorial, to date, most preventive interventions have focused on school-aged children in school settings and have met with limited success. In this review, we focus on another set of influences that impact the development of children's eating and weight status: parenting and feeding styles and practices.

Author(s): 
Ventura, Alison K.
Birch, Leann L.

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