Cost Sharing

Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.)

This study employed a new-user design to assess predictors of persistence with antihypertensive therapy, with emphasis on prescription drug cost-sharing. This retrospective longitudinal analysis used 2001-2002 claims data from 45 large health plans. The sample consisted of 23,047 individuals with hypertension, aged 41 to 65 years and receiving new antihypertensive treatment of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, or diuretics.

Author(s): 
Briesacher, Becky A.
Limcangco, M. Rhona
Frech-Tamas, Feride
Publication Title: 
Health Services Research

OBJECTIVES: To examine the impact of benefit generosity and household health care financial burden on the demand for specialty drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Enrollment, claims, and benefit design information for 35 large private employers during 2000-2005. STUDY DESIGN: We estimated multivariate models of the effects of benefit generosity and household financial burden on initiation and continuation of biologic therapies.

Author(s): 
Karaca-Mandic, Pinar
Joyce, Geoffrey F.
Goldman, Dana P.
Laouri, Marianne
Publication Title: 
Health Services Research

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of a coverage expansion versus a Medicaid physician fee increase on children's utilization of physician services. PRIMARY DATA SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (1997-2009). STUDY DESIGN: We use the Children's Health Insurance Program, enacted in 1997, as a natural experiment, and we performed a panel data regression analysis using the state-year as the unit of observation.

Author(s): 
White, Chapin
Publication Title: 
Health Economics

International differences in long-term care (LTC) use are well documented, but not well understood. Using comparable data from two countries with universal public LTC insurance, the Netherlands and Germany, we examine how institutional differences relate to differences in the choice for informal and formal LTC. Although the overall LTC utilization rate is similar in both countries, use of formal care is more prevalent in the Netherlands and informal care use in Germany.

Author(s): 
Bakx, Pieter
de Meijer, Claudine
Schut, Frederik
van Doorslaer, Eddy
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Managed Care

OBJECTIVES: To quantify how access to on-patent drugs by tier placement varies by insurance type and therapeutic area. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of insurance plan drug coverage data. METHODS: Drug coverage information was collected from the Fingertip Formulary database in May 2011 for 3 drug classes (statins, angiotensin II receptor blockers, and protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors) across 3 therapeutic areas with varying levels of generic drug availability.

Author(s): 
RÈgnier, Stephane A.
Publication Title: 
Health Affairs (Project Hope)

Just under seven million Americans acquired private insurance through the new health insurance exchanges, or Marketplaces, in 2014. The exchange plans are required to cover essential health benefits, including prescription drugs. However, the generosity of prescription drug coverage in the plans has not been well described. Our primary objective was to examine the variability in drug coverage in the exchanges across plan types (health maintenance organization or preferred provider organization) and metal tiers (bronze, silver, gold, and platinum).

Author(s): 
Buttorff, Christine
Andersen, Martin S.
Riggs, Kevin R.
Alexander, G. Caleb
Publication Title: 
Health Affairs (Project Hope)

Affordable Care Act provisions implemented in 2010 required insurance plans to offer dependent coverage to people ages 19-25 and to provide targeted preventive services with zero cost sharing. These provisions both increased the percentage of young adults with any source of health insurance coverage and improved the generosity of coverage. We examined how these provisions affected use of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which is among the most expensive of recommended vaccines, among young adult women.

Author(s): 
Lipton, Brandy J.
Decker, Sandra L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Economics

Cost-sharing rules for paying physicians have been advanced as a way of generating incentives for the provision of quality care, while recognizing their potential negative effects on production efficiency. However, the optimal sharing rate typically depends on the degree to which the physician acts in the interest of the patient, what we identify as the physician's altruism. Since the degree of altruism is likely to vary across physicians, and to be private information, the standard rules for setting the cost-sharing rate are unlikely to be optimal.

Author(s): 
Jack, William
Publication Title: 
Medical Care

OBJECTIVES: Chiropractic care is increasing in the United States, and there are few data about the effect of cost sharing on the use of chiropractic services. This study calculates the effect of cost sharing on chiropractic use. METHODS: The authors analyzed data from the RAND Health Insurance Experiment, a randomized controlled trial of the effect of cost sharing on the use of health services.

Author(s): 
Shekelle, P. G.
Rogers, W. H.
Newhouse, J. P.
Publication Title: 
Medical Care

OBJECTIVE: We sought to compare total outpatient costs of 4 common treatments for low-back pain (LBP) at 18-months follow-up. METHODS: Our work reports on findings from a randomized controlled trial within a large medical group practice treating HMO patients. Patients (n = 681) were assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups, ie, medical care only (MD), medical care with physical therapy (MDPt), chiropractic care only (DC), or chiropractic care with physical modalities (DCPm). Total outpatient costs, excluding pharmaceuticals, were measured at 18 months.

Author(s): 
Kominski, Gerald F.
Heslin, Kevin C.
Morgenstern, Hal
Hurwitz, Eric L.
Harber, Philip I.

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