Credentialing

Publication Title: 
HEC forum: an interdisciplinary journal on hospitals' ethical and legal issues

This article critically examines, from the perspective of a Roman Catholic Healthcare ethicist, the second edition of the Core Competencies for Healthcare Ethics Consultation report recently published by the American Society for Humanities and Bioethics. The question is posed: can the competencies identified in the report serve as the core competencies for Roman Catholic ethical consultants and consultation services? I answer in the negative.

Author(s): 
Bedford, Elliott Louis
Publication Title: 
Clinical Privilege White Paper
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) clinical services are increasingly provided within conventional health care settings. OBJECTIVE: To determine how a subset of U.S. academic health centers is credentialing CAM providers. DESIGN: An electronic survey was created focusing on the credentialing method utilized for six specific types of CAM clinical practitioners within academic medical settings. METHODS: This survey was electronically distributed to 33 academic health centers in the United States during the summer 2004.

Author(s): 
Nedrow, Anne
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nursing Education

Despite the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's adoption of the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree as the appropriate level of education for advanced practice, a number of controversies have persisted, including questions of timing, academic support, grandfathering, diffusion of nursing research, and economics. This article discusses the path to the professional doctorate in optometry, osteopathy, public health, pharmacy, physical therapy, audiology, chiropractic, and naturopathy.

Author(s): 
Brown-Benedict, Deonne J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) clinical services are increasingly provided within conventional health care settings. OBJECTIVE: To determine how a subset of U.S. academic health centers is credentialing CAM providers. DESIGN: An electronic survey was created focusing on the credentialing method utilized for six specific types of CAM clinical practitioners within academic medical settings. METHODS: This survey was electronically distributed to 33 academic health centers in the United States during the summer 2004.

Author(s): 
Nedrow, Anne
Publication Title: 
Clinical Privilege White Paper
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

Since the late 19th century, state legislatures and professional medical organizations have developed mechanisms to license physicians and other conventional nonphysician providers, establish standards of practice, and protect health care consumers by establishing standardized credentials as markers of competence. The popularity of complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies presents new challenges.

Author(s): 
Eisenberg, David M.
Cohen, Michael H.
Hrbek, Andrea
Grayzel, Jonathan
Van Rompay, Maria I.
Cooper, Richard A.
Publication Title: 
Occupational Outlook Quarterly / United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics in Cooperation with Veterans Administration
Author(s): 
Green, K.
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

Patients and families increasingly press hospitals to facilitate provision of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies and products. At the same time, a growing number of hospitals and health care facilities have taken steps to integrate CAM and conventional care. In this article we consider institutional responsibilities when patients/parents use or are considering CAM.

Author(s): 
Gilmour, Joan
Harrison, Christine
Asadi, Leyla
Cohen, Michael H.
Vohra, Sunita
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) clinical services are increasingly provided within conventional health care settings. OBJECTIVE: To determine how a subset of U.S. academic health centers is credentialing CAM providers. DESIGN: An electronic survey was created focusing on the credentialing method utilized for six specific types of CAM clinical practitioners within academic medical settings. METHODS: This survey was electronically distributed to 33 academic health centers in the United States during the summer 2004.

Author(s): 
Nedrow, Anne

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