Cross-Sectional Studies

Publication Title: 
Journal of Physical Activity & Health

BACKGROUND: The role of social-environmental factors in physical activity (PA) within lower income and ethnic minority populations is understudied. This study explored correlates of age-related PA and perceived walkability (PW). METHODS: Cross-sectional data (N = 401 women; ?18 y) were collected within the Jane-Finch community in Toronto, Ontario using questionnaires. Generalized additive models, an extension to multiple regression, were used to estimate effect sizes and standard errors.

Author(s): 
Perez, Daniel F.
Ritvo, Paul G.
Brown, Patrick E.
Holowaty, Eric
Ardern, Chris
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

BACKGROUND: A significant component of the ability to survive to exceptional old age may be familial. This study assessed the prevalence of age-related diseases in the offspring of centenarians. METHODS: The health histories of centenarian offspring (n=177) and controls (n=166) were assessed from 1997-2000 using a cross-sectional study design. The offspring of 192 centenarian subjects enrolled in the nationwide New England Centenarian Study were recruited and enrolled.

Author(s): 
Terry, Dellara F.
Wilcox, Marsha
McCormick, Maegan A.
Lawler, Elizabeth
Perls, Thomas T.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

OBJECTIVES: To assess the cause of death for centenarians' offspring and controls. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Community-based, nationwide sample. PARTICIPANTS: Family pedigree information was collected on 295 offspring of centenarians (from 106 families with a parent already enrolled in the nationwide New England Centenarian Study) and on 276 controls (from 82 control families) from 1997 to 2000. Controls were individuals whose parents were born in the same year as the centenarians but at least one of whom died at the average life expectancy.

Author(s): 
Terry, Dellara F.
Wilcox, Marsha A.
McCormick, Maegan A.
Pennington, JaeMi Y.
Schoenhofen, Emily A.
Andersen, Stacy L.
Perls, Thomas T.
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

Recently, chromosome 4q25 was linked to exceptional human longevity, and a haplotype of the positional candidate microsomal transfer protein (MTP) gene was associated to the phenotype in U.S. Caucasians. We investigated whether linkage to 4q25 could be detected in 164 nonagenarian sibships of the Leiden Longevity Study. Additionally, we compared the MTP -493G/T and Q95H allele and haplotype frequencies in the Leiden Longevity Study (379 nonagenarians, 525 of their offspring, and 251 partners of their offspring) and in the Leiden 85-Plus Study (655 octogenarians and 244 young controls).

Author(s): 
Beekman, Marian
Blauw, Gerard Jan
Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.
Brandt, Bernd W.
Westendorp, Rudi G. J.
Slagboom, P. Eline
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

CONTEXT: A relation between low thyroid activity and prolonged life span in humans has been observed. Several studies have demonstrated hereditary and genetic influences on thyroid function. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to test whether low thyroid activity associated with extreme longevity constitutes a heritable phenotype, which could contribute to the familial longevity observed in the Leiden Longevity Study. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study. SETTING: The study was conducted at a university hospital in the city of Leiden, The Netherlands.

Author(s): 
Rozing, M. P.
Houwing-Duistermaat, J. J.
Slagboom, P. E.
Beekman, M.
Frˆlich, M.
de Craen, A. J. M.
Westendorp, R. G. J.
van Heemst, D.
Publication Title: 
BMC geriatrics

BACKGROUND: Centenarians are exceptional ageing paradigms, offering valuable information on achieving longevity. Although, there are several studies examining different biomedical factors as determinants of longevity in centenarians, little is known about gender differences with respect to personality traits and health locus of control. METHODS: Nation -wide study carried out in Greece, between 2007 and 2010. Our final sample of analysis consisted of 400 centenarians who reported on sociodemographic, disease-related and personality factors and health locus of control (HLC).

Author(s): 
Tigani, Xanthi
Artemiadis, Artemios K.
Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.
Chrousos, George P.
Darviri, Christina
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

OBJECTIVES: To test whether lower serum uric acid (UA) levels are associated with longevity independent of renal function. DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort study. SETTING: Ashkenazi Jewish individuals with exceptional longevity (Longevity Genes Project at Albert Einstein College of Medicine). PARTICIPANTS: Long-lived individuals (LLI) of Ashkenazi Jewish ethnicity (mean age ± standard deviation 97.7 ± 2.9, n = 365), their offspring (mean age ± standard deviation 68.2 ± 8.2, n = 593) and controls (without family history of longevity, mean age ± standard deviation 72.5 ± 9.9, n = 356).

Author(s): 
Lai, Jennifer Yi-Chun
Atzmon, Gil
Melamed, Michal L.
Hostetter, Thomas H.
Crandall, Jill P.
Barzilai, Nir
Bitzer, Markus
Publication Title: 
JAMA neurology

IMPORTANCE: Family studies of centenarians and long-lived persons have found substantial familial aggregation of survival to extreme ages; however, the extent to which such familial longevity is characterized by cognitively intact survival is not established. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether families with exceptional longevity are protected against cognitive impairment consistent with Alzheimer disease. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis. SETTING: Multisite study in New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Denmark.

Author(s): 
Cosentino, Stephanie
Schupf, Nicole
Christensen, Kaare
Andersen, Stacy L.
Newman, Anne
Mayeux, Richard
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

OBJECTIVES: To assess the associations among age, health status, and resting metabolic rate (RMR) in a large population of older adults. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis. SETTING: Community-dwelling volunteers from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). PARTICIPANTS: Persons aged 40 to 96 (mean 68.2 ± 11.0) who underwent a comprehensive physical examination, cognitive assessment, RMR testing, body composition assessment, and physical function testing during a 3-day clinic visit (N = 420).

Author(s): 
Schrack, Jennifer A.
Knuth, Nicolas D.
Simonsick, Eleanor M.
Ferrucci, Luigi
Publication Title: 
Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience

Attempts to correlate measures of intellectual ability with localized anatomical imaging features of the brain have yielded variable findings distributed across frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes. To better define the gray and white matter correlates of intellectual ability and the effects of sex and age, we analyzed the brains of 105 healthy individuals, ages 7-57 years, who had a Full Scale Intelligence Quotient (FSIQ) of 70 or higher. We examined associations of FSIQ with cortical thickness and with white matter volume throughout the cerebrum.

Author(s): 
Goh, Suzanne
Bansal, Ravi
Xu, Dongrong
Hao, Xuejun
Liu, Jun
Peterson, Bradley S.

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