Crying

Publication Title: 
Psychiatry

Early theorists described physical diseases (e.g., asthma, ulcers) thought to be associated with the inhibition of weeping (e.g., Alexander 1950), and catharsis theories (Breuer and Freud 1895/1955; Koestler 1964) postulated that unexpressed emotion accumulated as in a tank, and then overflowed as tears when a threshold level was exceeded. From a more biological perspective, it has been suggested that stress produces toxic chemicals in the body that become concentrated in the lacrimal gland and are released through weeping, restoring homeostasis (Frey 1985).

Author(s): 
Labott, S. M.
Elliott, R.
Eason, P. S.
Publication Title: 
Developmental Psychology

This article examines the extent to which secure base script knowledge-as reflected in an adult's ability to generate narratives in which attachment-related threats are recognized, competent help is provided, and the problem is resolved-is associated with adults' autonomic and subjective emotional responses to infant distress and nondistress vocalizations. Adults who demonstrated low levels of secure base knowledge showed greater electrodermal reactivity and stronger declines in their feelings of love while they listened to a recording of an infant crying.

Author(s): 
Groh, Ashley M.
Roisman, Glenn I.
Publication Title: 
The Canadian Nurse

The author is an undergraduate nursing student who has researched the effect of human contact on elderly clients who cry repetitively and without apparent reason. The study attempts to incorporate what we already know about the constant interaction between the individual and the family or social group. The theory developed by Martha A. Rogers was used as the conceptual framework. Rogers' theory compares individuals and their environments to waves in continual motion. Two clients were the focus of this study--a 78-year-old man and an 81-year-old woman.

Author(s): 
Gagnon, J.
Publication Title: 
The Canadian Nurse

The author is an undergraduate nursing student who has researched the effect of human contact on elderly clients who cry repetitively and without apparent reason. The study attempts to incorporate what we already know about the constant interaction between the individual and the family or social group. The theory developed by Martha A. Rogers was used as the conceptual framework. Rogers' theory compares individuals and their environments to waves in continual motion. Two clients were the focus of this study--a 78-year-old man and an 81-year-old woman.

Author(s): 
Gagnon, J.
Publication Title: 
Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences

BACKGROUND: About 10% of newborn babies have infantile colic which means that they cry more than 3 hours per day. The baby's crying risks disturbing the early parent-child interaction. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to illuminate the meaning of being a parent of a baby with infantile colic. DESIGN: An inductive qualitative interview study.

Author(s): 
Landgren, Kajsa
Hallstrˆm, Inger
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

A 56-year-old woman displayed a condition of alternating unilateral lachrymation while she was undergoing psychotherapy. Although she was aware of this condition only since her marriage, hypnotic age regression revealed its existence in childhood, together with mutism and a catatonic trance-like state. Further investigation revealed the connection of this symptom with her family constellation and the reappearance of the unilateral crying as an adult.

Author(s): 
LePage, K. E.
Schafer, D. W.
Miller, A.
Publication Title: 
ASDC journal of dentistry for children

This study investigates the acceptance of local anesthetic injection, utilizing hypnosis in twenty-nine children, ages four to thirteen years. Each subject was evaluated twice, once utilizing hypnosis before injection, and once without. A double blind research design was used to avoid effects of expectancy. Subjects in the study were videotaped during the procedure. Their behavior was rated independently by two pediatric dentists, using the North Carolina Behavior Rating Scale (NBRS). Transcutaneous pulse oximetry data were also recorded for each subject.

Author(s): 
Gokli, M. A.
Wood, A. J.
Mourino, A. P.
Farrington, F. H.
Best, A. M.
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

OBJECTIVE: Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) is a commonly performed radiologic procedure in children that can be both painful and frightening. Given the distress that some children experience during the VCUG and the need for children to be alert and cooperative during the procedure, finding a psychological intervention that helps children to manage anxiety, distress, and pain is clearly desirable. This study was designed to examine whether relaxation and analgesia facilitated with hypnosis could reduce distress and procedure time for children who undergo this procedure.

Author(s): 
Butler, Lisa D.
Symons, Barbara K.
Henderson, Shelly L.
Shortliffe, Linda D.
Spiegel, David
Publication Title: 
Infant Behavior & Development

Newborns' crying in response to the cry of another newborn has been called an empathetic response. The purpose of this study was to determine whether newborns of depressed mothers showed the same response. Newborns of depressed and non-depressed mothers were presented with cry sounds of themselves or other infants, and their sucking and heart rate were recorded. The newborns of non-depressed mothers responded to the cry sounds of other infants with reduced sucking and decreased heart rate.

Author(s): 
Field, Tiffany
Diego, Miguel
Hernandez-Reif, Maria
Fernandez, Mercedes
Publication Title: 
Archives of Disease in Childhood

BACKGROUND: Infants with neonatal cerebral insults are susceptible to excessive crying as a result of difficulties with self-regulation. AIMS: To compare the effectiveness of swaddling versus massage therapy in the management of excessive crying of infants with cerebral insults. METHODS: Randomised three-week parallel comparison of the efficacy of two intervention methods. Infants with symptoms of troublesome crying and their parents were randomly assigned to a swaddling intervention group (n = 13) or a massage intervention group (n = 12).

Author(s): 
Ohgi, S.
Akiyama, T.
Arisawa, K.
Shigemori, K.

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