Curriculum

Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: High levels of stress have been identified in medical students and increasingly in other health profession student population groups. As stress can affect psychological well-being and interfere with learning and clinical performance, there is a clear argument for universities to include health professional student well-being as an outcome in core curriculum. Mindfulness training is a potential construct to manage stress and enhance academic success.

Author(s): 
McConville, Janet
McAleer, Rachael
Hahne, Andrew
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Introducing holism and complementary medicine into mainstream medical education provides many scientific, philosophical, and personal challenges. The growth of new knowledge always necessitates venturing into areas, which are, by definition, unknown, hence arise potential clashes of ideology, knowledge, evidence, interpretation, language, and personality. This paper outlines some of the experience and progress made at Monash University Victoria, Australia, in teaching this material in undergraduate medical education.

Author(s): 
Hassed, Craig S.
Publication Title: 
Academic Psychiatry: The Journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry

OBJECTIVE: As it is increasingly recognized that cultural competence is an essential quality for any practicing psychiatrist, postgraduate psychiatry training programs need to incorporate cultural competence training into their curricula. This article documents the unique approach to resident cultural competence training being developed in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto, which has the largest residency training program in North America and is situated in an ethnically diverse city and country.

Author(s): 
Fung, Kenneth
Andermann, Lisa
Zaretsky, Ari
Lo, Hung-Tat
Publication Title: 
Nursing Research

BACKGROUND: Behavior change is integral to the prevention and treatment of many disorders associated with deleterious lifestyles. Rigorous scientific testing of behavior change interventions is an important goal for nursing research. APPROACH: The stage model for behavioral therapy development is recommended as a useful framework for evaluating behavior change strategies. The NIH model specifies three stages from initial testing of novel behavioral therapies to their dissemination in community settings.

Author(s): 
Marcus, Marianne T.
Liehr, Patricia R.
Schmitz, Joy
Moeller, F. Gerald
Swank, Paul
Fine, Micki
Cron, Stanley
Granmayeh, L. Kian
Carroll, Deidra D.
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

Alternative therapies are popular, and information about them should be included in the curricula of health profession schools. During 2000 to 2003, the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine awarded five-year education grants to 14 health professions schools in the United States and to the American Medical Students Association Foundation. The purpose of the grants was to integrate evidence-based information about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into the curriculum.

Author(s): 
Marcus, Donald M.
McCullough, Laurence
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: To explore First Year medical students' rating of CAM therapies following a core teaching session. To determine the influence of student gender and previous experience of CAM and therapist/teacher gender and professional background on ratings. DESIGN: Survey; self-administered questionnaire following a teaching session. SETTING: First Year medical students Behavioural Science module CAM teaching session, University of Birmingham Medical School, UK. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty (71.0%) students completed a questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Greenfield, S. M.
Innes, M. A.
Allan, T. F.
Wearn, A. M.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

As complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies become increasingly accepted healthcare options, it is of major importance for CAM institutions to enhance research literacy and an evidence-based perspective in their curricula. A research education program for students and faculty at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine (OCOM), developed in collaboration with the Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing, has been supported by an R25 award from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM).

Author(s): 
Lasater, Kathie
Salanti, Sonya
Fleishman, Susan
Coletto, Joseph
Jin, Hong
Lore, Roger
Hammerschlag, Richard
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad

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