Cystic Fibrosis

Publication Title: 
Respiratory Care

BACKGROUND: Meditative movement, such as tai chi, yoga, and qi gong, may benefit people with cystic fibrosis (CF), as a form of gentle exercise incorporating meditation, breathing, and relaxation. Respiratory function is the most common issue in CF. In this systematic review we synthesized the evidence on the effect of meditative movement on respiratory function in patients with CF. METHODS: We searched Chinese and English language databases with terms relating to tai chi/yoga/qi gong, and respiratory function/cough/dyspnea. Articles were screened and selected by 2 researchers.

Author(s): 
Lorenc, Ava B.
Wang, Yuyi
Madge, Susan L.
Hu, Xiaoyang
Mian, Awais M.
Robinson, Nicola
Publication Title: 
Respiratory Care

BACKGROUND: Meditative movement, such as tai chi, yoga, and qi gong, may benefit people with cystic fibrosis (CF), as a form of gentle exercise incorporating meditation, breathing, and relaxation. Respiratory function is the most common issue in CF. In this systematic review we synthesized the evidence on the effect of meditative movement on respiratory function in patients with CF. METHODS: We searched Chinese and English language databases with terms relating to tai chi/yoga/qi gong, and respiratory function/cough/dyspnea. Articles were screened and selected by 2 researchers.

Author(s): 
Lorenc, Ava B.
Wang, Yuyi
Madge, Susan L.
Hu, Xiaoyang
Mian, Awais M.
Robinson, Nicola
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Fatigue and unintentional weight loss are two of the commonest symptoms experienced by people with advanced progressive illness. Appropriate interventions may bring considerable improvements in function and quality of life to seriously ill people and their families, reducing physical, psychological and spiritual distress.

Author(s): 
Payne, Cathy
Wiffen, Philip J.
Martin, Suzanne
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Fatigue and unintentional weight loss are two of the commonest symptoms experienced by people with advanced progressive illness. Appropriate interventions may bring considerable improvements in function and quality of life to seriously ill people and their families, reducing physical, psychological and spiritual distress.

Author(s): 
Payne, Cathy
Wiffen, Philip J.
Martin, Suzanne
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: With increasing survival estimates for individuals with cystic fibrosis, long-term management has become an important focus. Psychological interventions are largely concerned with adherence to treatment, emotional and social adaptation and health-related quality of life. We are unaware of any relevant systematic reviews. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether psychological interventions for people with cystic fibrosis provide significant psychosocial and physical benefits in addition to standard medical care.

Author(s): 
Goldbeck, Lutz
Fidika, Astrid
Herle, Marion
Quittner, Alexandra L.
Publication Title: 
Respiratory Care

BACKGROUND: Meditative movement, such as tai chi, yoga, and qi gong, may benefit people with cystic fibrosis (CF), as a form of gentle exercise incorporating meditation, breathing, and relaxation. Respiratory function is the most common issue in CF. In this systematic review we synthesized the evidence on the effect of meditative movement on respiratory function in patients with CF. METHODS: We searched Chinese and English language databases with terms relating to tai chi/yoga/qi gong, and respiratory function/cough/dyspnea. Articles were screened and selected by 2 researchers.

Author(s): 
Lorenc, Ava B.
Wang, Yuyi
Madge, Susan L.
Hu, Xiaoyang
Mian, Awais M.
Robinson, Nicola
Publication Title: 
Phytotherapy research: PTR

Eleven decoctions, obtained from indian plants widely used in ayurvedic medicine, have been investigated as a possible source of molecules exhibiting biological activity on the interaction between DNA and NF-kB, a transcription factor involved in the expression of proinflammatory genes. Cystic fibrosis (CF) cell line stimulated by TNF-? has been used as inflammatory cellular model to determinate interleukin-8 (IL-8), one of the most relevant pro-inflammatory mediator in CF regulated by the NF-kB.

Author(s): 
Guerrini, Alessandra
Mancini, Irene
Maietti, Silvia
Rossi, Damiano
Poli, Ferruccio
Sacchetti, Gianni
Gambari, Roberto
Borgatti, Monica
Publication Title: 
Drugs of Today (Barcelona, Spain: 1998)

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disorder that affects over 30,000 people in the U.S. and 70,000 worldwide. CF is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene, which codes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. CFTR is a chloride and bicarbonate channel and regulates several ion transporters at the epithelial cell membrane, controlling hydration or ionic composition of epithelial secretions. Management of CF is currently supportive, but recent advances in drug development have focused on therapies that assist mutant CFTR function.

Author(s): 
McPhail, G. L.
Clancy, J. P.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Dietetic Association

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized clinically by recurrent respiratory tract infections and malabsorption caused by pancreatic insufficiency. Typically diagnosed during infancy or childhood, CF impairs weight gain and growth, increases susceptibility to infection, and decreases longevity. Until recently, no guidelines for infant feedings were available. A consensus report prepared through the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation summarizes guidelines for the optimal nutrition management of patients with CF.

Author(s): 
Cannella, P. C.
Bowser, E. K.
Guyer, L. K.
Borum, P. R.
Publication Title: 
Paediatric Respiratory Reviews

Diabetes mellitus has evolved as a complication because of increased longevity of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). CF-related diabetes (CFRD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, therefore, prompt diagnosis and aggressive management are important. The prevalence of CFRD increases with age with an age-dependent incidence rate of 5% per year; at 30 years 50% of patients are diabetic. CFRD develops insidiously.

Author(s): 
Lanng, S.

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