Cytokines

Publication Title: 
Brain, Behavior, and Immunity

Physical activity (PA) is emerging as a safe and effective tool in the prevention and treatment of psychiatric disorders. PA subtypes include aerobic, resistance, flexibility, neuromotor (involving balance, agility and co-ordination), mind-body (e.g. tai chi, qi gong and yoga) and mixed type trainings. Evidence from clinical trials suggests that PA subtypes can have positive clinical effects, however the effects on the symptomatology may vary according to the PA subtype.

Author(s): 
Eyre, Harris A.
Baune, Bernhard T.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Only a small number of articles have investigated the relationship between mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) and biomarkers. The aim of this systematic review was to study the effect of MBIs on specific biomarkers (cytokines, neuropeptides and C-reactive protein (CRP)) in both healthy subjects and cancer patients. METHODS: A search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO and the Cochrane library between 1980 and September 2016. RESULTS: A total of 13 studies with 1110 participants were included.

Author(s): 
Sanada, Kenji
Alda Díez, Marta
Salas Valero, Montserrat
Pérez-Yus, María C.
Demarzo, Marcelo M. P.
Montero-Marin, Jesús
García-Toro, Mauro
García-Campayo, Javier
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Mindfulness meditation represents a mental training framework for cultivating the state of mindful awareness in daily life. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in how mindfulness meditation improves human health and well-being. Although studies have shown that mindfulness meditation can improve self-reported measures of disease symptomatology, the effect that mindfulness meditation has on biological mechanisms underlying human aging and disease is less clear.

Author(s): 
Black, David S.
Slavich, George M.
Publication Title: 
Brain, Behavior, and Immunity

Physical activity (PA) is emerging as a safe and effective tool in the prevention and treatment of psychiatric disorders. PA subtypes include aerobic, resistance, flexibility, neuromotor (involving balance, agility and co-ordination), mind-body (e.g. tai chi, qi gong and yoga) and mixed type trainings. Evidence from clinical trials suggests that PA subtypes can have positive clinical effects, however the effects on the symptomatology may vary according to the PA subtype.

Author(s): 
Eyre, Harris A.
Baune, Bernhard T.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Intensive Care Medicine

BACKGROUND: Acupuncture treatment has been employed in China for over 2500 years and it is used worldwide as analgesia in acute and chronic pain. Acupuncture is also used in general anesthesia (GA). The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) in addition to GA in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODS: We searched 3 databases (Pubmed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science-from 1965 until January 31, 2017) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including patients undergoing cardiac surgery and receiving GA alone or GA + EA.

Author(s): 
Asmussen, Sven
Przkora, Rene
Maybauer, Dirk M.
Fraser, John F.
Sanfilippo, Filippo
Jennings, Kristofer
Adamzik, Michael
Maybauer, Marc O.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics

INTRODUCTION: Turmeric has been described in ayurveda, and is referred by different names in different cultures, the active principle called curcumin or diferuloylmethane, has been shown to exhibit numerous activities. Extensive research over the last half century has revealed several important functions of curcumin. It binds to a variety of proteins and inhibits the activity of various kinases. By modulating the activation of various transcription factors, curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory enzymes, cytokines, adhesion molecules, and cell survival proteins.

Author(s): 
Ara, Syeda Arshiya
Mudda, Jayashree A.
Lingappa, Ashok
Rao, Purushottam
Publication Title: 
Arthritis and Rheumatism

OBJECTIVE: Chebulagic acid (CHE) from the immature seeds of Terminalia chebula was identified from a natural product library as a potent suppressor of T cell activity. This study examined the effectiveness of CHE against the onset and progression of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. METHODS: Arthritis was induced in DBA/1J mice by subcutaneous immunization with bovine type II collagen on days 0 and 21. CHE was administered intraperitoneally for 3 weeks, either as prophylaxis (10 or 20 mg/kg) before disease onset or as therapy (20 mg/kg) after disease onset.

Author(s): 
Lee, Sang-Ik
Hyun, Pung-Mi
Kim, Seung-Hyung
Kim, Kyoung-Shin
Lee, Sang-Keun
Kim, Byoung-Soo
Maeng, Pil Jae
Lim, Jong-Soon
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology

OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the anti-arthritic effect of Terminalia chebula hydroalcoholic extract (TCHE) in experimental models and attempts to correlate the effect of treatment on macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and extent of disease activity. METHODS: Arthritis was induced in rats by subplantar administration of either formaldehyde or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Joint size was measured at regular intervals by using a micrometer screw gauge.

Author(s): 
Nair, Vinod
Singh, Surender
Gupta, Yogendra Kumar
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic degenerative autoimmune disease characterized by persistent inflammation of synovial membranes, which leads to cartilage destruction and bone erosion. To date, there are no effective therapies to slow the progress of this degenerative condition. Here, we evaluate the anti-arthritic effect of chebulanin, an abundant anti-inflammatory agent isolated from Terminalia chebula, in collagen induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice by intragastric administration.

Author(s): 
Zhao, Yinglan
Liu, Fang
Liu, Yao
Zhou, Dan
Dai, Qing
Liu, Songqing
Publication Title: 
Toxicology International

OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to investigate underlying molecular mechanism for antitumorigenic potential of Terminalia chebula (TC) against chemically-induced skin tumorigenesis in Swiss albino mice. It is used as herbal medicine because it exhibits antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic activity. However, the précised underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated.

Author(s): 
Majed, Ferial
Nafees, Sana
Rashid, Summya
Ali, Nemat
Hasan, Syed Kazim
Ali, Rashid
Shahid, Ayaz
Sultana, Sarwat

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