Decompression, Surgical

Publication Title: 
Medicine

Many treatments for shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) are available in clinical practice; some of which have already been compared with other treatments by various investigators. However, a comprehensive treatment comparison is lacking. Several widely used electronic databases were searched for eligible studies. The outcome measurements were the pain score and the Constant-Murley score (CMS).

Author(s): 
Dong, Wei
Goost, Hans
Lin, Xiang-Bo
Burger, Christof
Paul, Christian
Wang, Zeng-Li
Zhang, Tian-Yi
Jiang, Zhi-Chao
Welle, Kristian
Kabir, Koroush
Publication Title: 
Anesthesiology

BACKGROUND: Automatic control of depth of hypnosis using the Bispectral Index (BIS) can help to reduce phases of inadequate control. Automated BIS control with propofol or isoflurane administration via an infusion system has recently been described, a comparable study with isoflurane administration via a vaporizer had not been conducted yet. Our hypothesis was that our new model based closed-loop control system can safely be applied clinically and maintains the BIS within a defined target range better than manual control.

Author(s): 
Locher, Stephan
Stadler, Konrad S.
Boehlen, Thomas
Bouillon, Thomas
Leibundgut, Daniel
Schumacher, Peter M.
Wymann, Rolf
Zbinden, Alex M.
Publication Title: 
Spine

STUDY DESIGN: A case of symptomatic hematoma of cervical ligamentum flavum. OBJECTIVE: To report the first ligamentum flavum hematoma in the cervical spine and review the reported cases. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: A herniated nucleus pulposis, spondylosis, epidural hematoma or abscess, neoplasm, or some pathology of the ligamentum flavum, such as hypertrophy, ossification, or calcification, are the most common causes of spinal cord and nerve root compression.

Author(s): 
Chen, Hsien-Chih
Hsu, Peng-Wei
Lin, Chin-Yew
Tzaan, Wen-Ching
Publication Title: 
Europa Medicophysica

There are evidences to support recommending the early intake of prednisone (in its appropriate dose of 1 mg/kg body weight for up to 70 or 80 mg/day) or the combined use of prednisone and acyclovir (or valacyclovir) within 72 h following the onset of paralysis in order to improve the outcome of Bell's palsy (BP). Although there may be a controversy about the role of physiotherapy in BP or facial palsy, it seemed that local superficial heat therapy, massage, exercises, electrical stimulation and biofeedback training have a place in the treatment of lower motor facial palsy.

Author(s): 
Shafshak, T. S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: To simultaneously quantify vertebral motions and neuromuscular and spinal nerve root responses to mechanical force, manually assisted, short-lever spinal manipulative thrusts. METHODS: Four patients underwent lumbar laminarthrectomy to decompress the central spinal canal and neuroforamina, as clinically indicated. Prior to decompression, finely threaded, 1.8-mm diameter intraosseous pins were rigidly fixed to the lumbar spinous process (L1 or L3) using fluoroscopic guidance, and a high-frequency, low-noise, 10-g, triaxial accelerometer was mounted to the pin.

Author(s): 
Colloca, Christopher J.
Keller, Tony S.
Gunzburg, Robert
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to quantify in vivo vertebral motions and neurophysiological responses during spinal manipulation. METHODS: Nine patients undergoing lumbar decompression surgery participated in this study. Spinal manipulative thrusts (SMTs) ( approximately 5 ms; 30 N [Sham], 88 N, 117 N, and 150 N [max]) were administered to lumbar spine facet joints (FJs) and spinous processes (SPs) adjacent to an intraosseous pin with an attached triaxial accelerometer and bipolar electrodes cradled around the S1 spinal nerve roots.

Author(s): 
Colloca, Christopher J.
Keller, Tony S.
Gunzburg, Robert
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: To present a case of symptomatic, expansile L1 vertebral hemangioma. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 46-year-old man presented with progressive neurologic changes and insidious onset of low back pain. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: After a trial of 3 visits of conservative chiropractic care, no improvement was noted. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained, revealing an expansile hemangioma with extra-osseous component compromising the conus medullaris at the level of the L1 lumbar vertebra. Neurosurgical intervention resulted in clinical improvement.

Author(s): 
Rich, Jeffrey A.
Donahue, Thomas C.
Mick, Timothy J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: To simultaneously quantify vertebral motions and neuromuscular and spinal nerve root responses to mechanical force, manually assisted, short-lever spinal manipulative thrusts. METHODS: Four patients underwent lumbar laminarthrectomy to decompress the central spinal canal and neuroforamina, as clinically indicated. Prior to decompression, finely threaded, 1.8-mm diameter intraosseous pins were rigidly fixed to the lumbar spinous process (L1 or L3) using fluoroscopic guidance, and a high-frequency, low-noise, 10-g, triaxial accelerometer was mounted to the pin.

Author(s): 
Colloca, Christopher J.
Keller, Tony S.
Gunzburg, Robert
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to quantify in vivo vertebral motions and neurophysiological responses during spinal manipulation. METHODS: Nine patients undergoing lumbar decompression surgery participated in this study. Spinal manipulative thrusts (SMTs) ( approximately 5 ms; 30 N [Sham], 88 N, 117 N, and 150 N [max]) were administered to lumbar spine facet joints (FJs) and spinous processes (SPs) adjacent to an intraosseous pin with an attached triaxial accelerometer and bipolar electrodes cradled around the S1 spinal nerve roots.

Author(s): 
Colloca, Christopher J.
Keller, Tony S.
Gunzburg, Robert
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: To present a case of symptomatic, expansile L1 vertebral hemangioma. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 46-year-old man presented with progressive neurologic changes and insidious onset of low back pain. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: After a trial of 3 visits of conservative chiropractic care, no improvement was noted. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained, revealing an expansile hemangioma with extra-osseous component compromising the conus medullaris at the level of the L1 lumbar vertebra. Neurosurgical intervention resulted in clinical improvement.

Author(s): 
Rich, Jeffrey A.
Donahue, Thomas C.
Mick, Timothy J.

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