Defiance

Publication Title: 
Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds

The wonderful influence of imagination in the cure diseases is well known. A motion of the hand, or a glance of the eye, will throw a weak and credulous patient into a fit; and a pill made of bread, if taken with sufficient faith, will operate a cure better than all the drugs in the pharmacopoeia. The Prince of Orange, at the siege of Breda, in 1625, cured, all his soldiers, who were dying of the scurvy, by a philanthropic piece of quackery, which he played upon them with the knowledge of the physicians, when all other means had failed.

Author(s): 
Mackay, Charles

The object of the author in the following pages has been to collect the most remarkable instances of those moral epidemics which have been excited, sometimes by one cause and sometimes by another, and to show how easily the masses have been led astray, and how imitative, and gregarious men are, even in their infatuations and crimes.

Author(s): 
Mackay, Charles
Publication Title: 
Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds

Who has not either seen or heard of some house, shut up and uninhabitable, fallen into decay, and looking dusty and dreary, from which, at midnight, strange sounds have been heard to issue—aerial knockings—the rattling of chains, and the groaning of perturbed spirits?—a house that people have thought it unsafe to pass after dark, and which has remained for years without a tenant, and which no tenant would occupy, even were he paid to do so?

Author(s): 
Mackay, Charles
Publication Title: 
Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds

The belief that disembodied spirits may be permitted to revisit this world has its foundation upon that sublime hope of immortality which is at once the chief solace and greatest triumph of our reason. Even if revelation did not teach us, we feel that we have that within us which shall never die; and all our experience of this life but makes us cling the more fondly to that one repaying hope.

Author(s): 
Mackay, Charles
Publication Title: 
Minor mental maladjustments in normal people: Based on original autobiographies of personality maladjustments

The study of the primitive modes of thought and belief which still exist in civilized society alongside of the highest forms of culture and scientific thinking, is of perennial and absorbing interest to a large segment of our population. There is little need to add to our already extensive lore of superstitions, witchcraft, ghost stories, signs, wonders, omens, "conjure," sayings, and incantations—most of which have been transmitted orally as social tradition. The reports herewith submitted give some slight indication of the variety of primitive beliefs still in vogue.

Author(s): 
Wallace, J. E.
Publication Title: 
Man above humanity: A history of psychotherapy

The panorama of witchcraft is of significance in a total view of the history of psychiatry chiefly because it illustrates the operation of a psychological-cultural mode on functions of the human mind. In the modern sense, witchcraft was neither the psychiatry of medievalism nor the psychotherapy of that period. It was, however, a phase in man's adaptation to certain psychological realities. It encompassed a complex group of observances, ideas and beliefs which sought to control behavior patterns that now lie within the area which the psychological sciences claim as their interest.

Author(s): 
Bromberg, Walter
Publication Title: 
The rape of the mind: The psychology of thought control, menticide, and brainwashing

A fantastic thing is happening in our world. Today a man is no longer punished only for the crimes he has in fact committed. Now he may be compelled to confess to crimes that have been conjured up by his judges, who use his confession for political purposes. It is not enough for us to damn as evil those who sit in judgment. We must understand what impels the false admission of guilt; we must take another look at the human mind in all its frailty and vulnerability.

Author(s): 
M, A.
Publication Title: 
Dynamic psychopathology

This chapter deals with unusual phenomena. Although not exactly abnormal, such data give added insight to certain psychopathological conditions. An attempt is subsequently made to relate this subject to mental disorders as observed from the following areas: occultism, sleep, dreams, and hypnotism. Occultism is defined as an ancient art which investigates the occurrences of mysterious and extraordinary happenings. It was most prevalent during the Middle Ages in the form of alchemy, astrology, divination, necromancy, and witchcraft.

Author(s): 
Graham, Thomas F.
Publication Title: 
History of psychology and psychiatry

The spurning of the classics was not the worst transgression of Europe during the Dark Ages. As superstition spread among all classes, and Church dogma ruled with an iron hand, abnormal behavior was no longer associated with medicine, but rather with the supernatural and, therefore, was seen as coming under the jurisdiction of theology. Indeed, even ordinary disabilities were related to religion. It was not the physician but God who effects the cure, through the intercession of Mary or the saints. The saints must be appealed to.

Author(s): 
A, A.
Publication Title: 
History of psychology and psychiatry

This chapter outlines the response of King James I of Scotland to the the works of Weyer (see record 2008-12600-015) and Reginald Scot, a layman who shared the same humane and enlightened views of psychopathology as Weyer. Scot's work punctured general superstitions about mental disorders and their relationship to witchcraft. James I refuted Scot and Weyer in his 1597 work Daemonologie. By this time, however, the natural approach to mental disorders was beginning to prevail in France and England.

Author(s): 
A, A.

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