Depression

Publication Title: 
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy

Eudaimonic well-being that protects mental and physical health has received increasing attention. This investigation aimed to review which comprehensive instruments for measuring eudaimonic well-being were applied with clinical populations (reporting mental or physical illnesses), beyond Ryff's Psychological Well-Being Scale. Articles citing at least 1 of the measures of eudaimonic well-being identified by previous theoretical work were extracted from medical and psychological electronic databases and screened.

Author(s): 
Brandel, Martina
Vescovelli, Francesca
Ruini, Chiara
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of yoga nidra on psychological problems in women with menstrual disorders. METHODS: A search was conducted using CINAHL, the Cochrane library, Embase, PsycINFO, and PubMed electronic databases, and using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in any language up to and including July 2016, which reported the psychological effects of yoga nidra in women with menstrual disorders. RESULTS: Two potential trials were identified and both were included in the review.

Author(s): 
Kim, Sang-Dol
Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

OBJECTIVES: To review the evidence for the effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for depression. DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature search using PubMed, PsycLit, the Cochrane Library and previous review papers. DATA SYNTHESIS: Thirty-seven treatments were identified and grouped under the categories of medicines, physical treatments, lifestyle, and dietary changes. We give a description of each treatment, the rationale behind the treatment, a review of studies on effectiveness, and the level of evidence for the effectiveness studies.

Author(s): 
Jorm, Anthony F.
Christensen, Helen
Griffiths, Kathleen M.
Rodgers, Bryan
Publication Title: 
Sleep Medicine Reviews

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is defined as an irresistible urge to move the legs, which is usually accompanied by paresthesias or dysesthesias at least twice weekly, and affects 2%-4% of adults in Europe and North America. This systematic review assesses the current complementary and alternative options for RLS and the potential benefits of those treatments on sleep quality, mood disorder, and quality of life. A systematic search of the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases was conducted.

Author(s): 
Xu, Xiao-Min
Liu, Yang
Jia, Shi-Yu
Dong, Mei-Xue
Cao, Du
Wei, You-Dong
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Occupational Therapy: Official Publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association

This article is the first part of a systematic review of evidence for the effectiveness of cancer rehabilitation interventions within the scope of occupational therapy that address the activity and participation needs of adult cancer survivors. This article focuses on the importance of physical activity and symptom management. Strong evidence supports the use of exercise for cancer-related fatigue and indicates that lymphedema is not exacerbated by exercise.

Author(s): 
Hunter, Elizabeth G.
Gibson, Robert W.
Arbesman, Marian
D'Amico, Mariana
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Occupational Therapy: Official Publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association

OBJECTIVE: We reviewed the efficacy of occupational therapy-related interventions for adults with rheumatoid arthritis. METHOD: We examined 51 Level I studies (19 physical activity, 32 psychoeducational) published 2000-2014 and identified from five databases. Interventions that focused solely on the upper or lower extremities were not included. RESULTS: Findings related to key outcomes (activities of daily living, ability, pain, fatigue, depression, self-efficacy, disease symptoms) are presented. Strong evidence supports the use of aerobic exercise, resistive exercise, and aquatic therapy.

Author(s): 
Siegel, Patricia
Tencza, Melissa
Apodaca, Beverly
Poole, Janet L.
Publication Title: 
Mindfulness

Presenting with common mental health difficulties, particularly depression and anxiety, there is also preliminary evidence that mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) including mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) and integrated mindfulness yoga practices may also be effective in reducing common mental health difficulties during pregnancy. We systematically reviewed and synthesized the current literature on the effectiveness of MBIs in reducing severity of perinatal anxiety and depression.

Author(s): 
Shi, Zhenrong
MacBeth, Angus
Publication Title: 
CA: a cancer journal for clinicians

Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited.

Author(s): 
Greenlee, Heather
DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Carlson, Linda E.
Cohen, Misha R.
Deng, Gary
Johnson, Jillian A.
Mumber, Matthew
Seely, Dugald
Zick, Suzanna M.
Boyce, Lindsay M.
Tripathy, Debu
Publication Title: 
Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

Surveys have demonstrated that complementary medicine use for depression is widespread, although patterns of use vary. A series of systematic reviews provide a summary of the current evidence for acupuncture, aromatherapy and massage, homeopathy, meditation, reflexology, herbal medicine, yoga, and several dietary supplements and relaxation techniques. The quantity and quality of individual studies vary widely, but research interest in complementary therapies is increasing, particularly in herbal and nutritional products.

Author(s): 
Pilkington, Karen
Rampes, Hagen
Richardson, Janet
Publication Title: 
Brain, Behavior, and Immunity

Physical activity (PA) is emerging as a safe and effective tool in the prevention and treatment of psychiatric disorders. PA subtypes include aerobic, resistance, flexibility, neuromotor (involving balance, agility and co-ordination), mind-body (e.g. tai chi, qi gong and yoga) and mixed type trainings. Evidence from clinical trials suggests that PA subtypes can have positive clinical effects, however the effects on the symptomatology may vary according to the PA subtype.

Author(s): 
Eyre, Harris A.
Baune, Bernhard T.

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