Depression

Publication Title: 
Psychosomatics

OBJECTIVE: Of the 34 million adult Americans (17%) using mind-body medicine therapies, 8 million (24%) have anxiety/depression. The evidence for using mind-body therapies to address varying depressive symptoms in populations with and without other chronic comorbidities is reviewed. METHODS: Systematic literature searches of PubMed (Medline), Embase, CINAHL, and the seven databases encompassed by Current Contents, Web of Science, and Web of Knowledge were conducted.

Author(s): 
D'Silva, Sahana
Poscablo, Cristina
Habousha, Racheline
Kogan, Mikhail
Kligler, Benjamin
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Family Practice

Yes. Exercise reduces patient-perceived symptoms of depression when used as monotherapy (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials [RCTs] with significant heterogeneity). It relieves symptoms as effectively as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or pharmacologic anti-depressant therapy (SOR: B, meta-analysis) and more effectively than bright light therapy (SOR: B, meta-analysis). Resistance exercise and mixed exercise (resistance and aerobic) work better than aerobic exercise alone (SOR: B, meta-analysis).

Author(s): 
Gill, Alan
Womack, Rosalind
Safranek, Sarah
Publication Title: 
Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine

The purpose of this article was to systematically review yoga interventions aimed at improving depressive symptoms. A total of 23 interventions published between 2011 and May 2016 were evaluated in this review. Three study designs were used: randomized control trials, quasi-experimental, and pretest/posttest, with majority being randomized control trials. Most of the studies were in the United States. Various yoga schools were used, with the most common being Hatha yoga.

Author(s): 
Bridges, Ledetra
Sharma, Manoj
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that physical activity delays the onset of dementia in healthy older adults and slows down cognitive decline to prevent the onset of cognitive disability. Studies using animal models suggest that physical activity has the potential to attenuate the pathophysiology of dementia. 'Physical activity' refers to 'usual care plus physical activity'.

Author(s): 
Forbes, Dorothy
Forbes, Sean
Morgan, Debra G.
Markle-Reid, Maureen
Wood, Jennifer
Culum, Ivan
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise interventions on overall health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its domains among adults scheduled to, or actively undergoing, cancer treatment. DATA SOURCES: 11 electronic databases were searched through November 2011. In addition, the authors searched PubMed's related article feature, trial registries, and reference lists of included trials and related reviews. DATA SYNTHESIS: 56 trials with 4,826 participants met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula
Gotay, Carolyn
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the cancer most frequently diagnosed in women worldwide. Even though survival rates are continually increasing, breast cancer is often associated with long-term psychological distress, chronic pain, fatigue and impaired quality of life. Yoga comprises advice for an ethical lifestyle, spiritual practice, physical activity, breathing exercises and meditation. It is a complementary therapy that is commonly recommended for breast cancer-related impairments and has been shown to improve physical and mental health in people with different cancer types.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Klose, Petra
Lange, Silke
Langhorst, Jost
Dobos, Gustav J.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Malignant neoplasms of the lymphoid or myeloid cell lines including lymphoma, leukaemia and myeloma are referred to as haematological malignancies. Complementary and alternative treatment options such as meditation practice or yoga are becoming popular by treating all aspects of the disease including physical and psychological symptoms. However, there is still unclear evidence about meditation's effectiveness, and how its practice affects the lives of haematologically-diseased patients.

Author(s): 
Salhofer, Ines
Will, Andrea
Monsef, Ina
Skoetz, Nicole
Publication Title: 
PloS One

AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine whether non-verbal therapies are effective in treating depressive symptoms in psychotic disorders. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Psychinfo, Picarta, Embase and ISI Web of Science, up to January 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing a non-verbal intervention to a control condition in patients with psychotic disorders, whilst measuring depressive symptoms as a primary or secondary outcome, were included.

Author(s): 
Steenhuis, Laura A.
Nauta, Maaike H.
Bocking, Claudi L. H.
Pijnenborg, Gerdina H. M.
Publication Title: 
Pediatric Physical Therapy: The Official Publication of the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association

PURPOSE: We completed a systematic review of the literature on the effect of yoga on quality of life and physical outcome measures in the pediatric population. We explored various databases and included case-control and pilot studies, cohort and randomized controlled trials that examined yoga as an exercise intervention for children. SUMMARY OF KEY POINTS: Using the Sackett levels of evidence, this article reviews the literature on yoga as a complementary mind-body movement therapy.

Author(s): 
Galantino, Mary Lou
Galbavy, Robyn
Quinn, Lauren
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: People with cancer undergoing active treatment experience numerous disease- and treatment-related adverse outcomes and poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Exercise interventions are hypothesized to alleviate these adverse outcomes. HRQoL and its domains are important measures of cancer survivorship, both during and after the end of active treatment for cancer. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise on overall HRQoL outcomes and specific HRQoL domains among adults with cancer during active treatment.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula M.
Berlanstein, Debra R.
Topaloglu, Ozlem

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