Depression

Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychiatric Research

Stress related disorders such as depression and anxiety are leading sources of disability worldwide, and current treatment methods such as conventional antidepressant medications are not beneficial for all individuals. There is evidence that yoga has mood-enhancing properties possibly related to its inhibitory effects on physiological stress and inflammation, which are frequently associated with affective disorders. However the biological mechanisms via which yoga exerts its therapeutic mood-modulating effects are largely unknown.

Author(s): 
Pascoe, Michaela C.
Bauer, Isabelle E.
Publication Title: 
BMC psychiatry

BACKGROUND: Prenatal depression can negatively affect the physical and mental health of both mother and fetus. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of yoga as an intervention in the management of prenatal depression. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted by searching PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library and PsycINFO from all retrieved articles describing such trials up to July 2014. RESULTS: Six RCTs were identified in the systematic search.

Author(s): 
Gong, Hong
Ni, Chenxu
Shen, Xiaoliang
Wu, Tengyun
Jiang, Chunlei
Publication Title: 
Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

Surveys have demonstrated that complementary medicine use for depression is widespread, although patterns of use vary. A series of systematic reviews provide a summary of the current evidence for acupuncture, aromatherapy and massage, homeopathy, meditation, reflexology, herbal medicine, yoga, and several dietary supplements and relaxation techniques. The quantity and quality of individual studies vary widely, but research interest in complementary therapies is increasing, particularly in herbal and nutritional products.

Author(s): 
Pilkington, Karen
Rampes, Hagen
Richardson, Janet
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology International

A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of meditative movement therapies (Qigong, Tai Chi and Yoga) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) was carried out. We screened Clinicaltrials.Gov, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed and Scopus (through December 2010) and the reference sections of original studies for meditative movement therapies (MMT) in FMS. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing MMT to controls were analysed. Outcomes of efficacy were pain, sleep, fatigue, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Author(s): 
Langhorst, Jost
Klose, Petra
Dobos, Gustav J.
Bernardy, Kathrin
Häuser, Winfried
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology International

A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of meditative movement therapies (Qigong, Tai Chi and Yoga) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) was carried out. We screened Clinicaltrials.Gov, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed and Scopus (through December 2010) and the reference sections of original studies for meditative movement therapies (MMT) in FMS. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing MMT to controls were analysed. Outcomes of efficacy were pain, sleep, fatigue, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Author(s): 
Langhorst, Jost
Klose, Petra
Dobos, Gustav J.
Bernardy, Kathrin
Häuser, Winfried
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

BACKGROUND: Tai chi, also called taiji or tai chi chuan, is a form of mind-body exercise that originated from China. It combines Chinese martial arts and meditative movements that promote balance and healing of the mind and body, involving a series of slowly performed, dance-like postures that flow into one another. As it comprises mental concentration, physical balance, muscle relaxation, and relaxed breathing, tai chi shows great potential for becoming widely integrated into the prevention and rehabilitation of a number of medical and psychological conditions.

Author(s): 
Wang, Fang
Lee, Eun-Kyoung Othelia
Wu, Taixiang
Benson, Herbert
Fricchione, Gregory
Wang, Weidong
Yeung, Albert S.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: A growing number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have investigated the therapeutic value of yoga interventions. This bibliometric analysis aimed to provide a comprehensive review of the characteristics of the totality of available randomized yoga trials. METHODS: All RCTs of yoga were eligible. Medline/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, IndMED, and the tables of content of yoga specialty journals not listed in medical databases were screened through February 2014. Bibliometric data, data on participants, and intervention were extracted and analyzed descriptively.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
BMC psychiatry

BACKGROUND: Prenatal depression can negatively affect the physical and mental health of both mother and fetus. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of yoga as an intervention in the management of prenatal depression. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted by searching PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library and PsycINFO from all retrieved articles describing such trials up to July 2014. RESULTS: Six RCTs were identified in the systematic search.

Author(s): 
Gong, Hong
Ni, Chenxu
Shen, Xiaoliang
Wu, Tengyun
Jiang, Chunlei
Publication Title: 
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs

BACKGROUND: The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. METHODS: Following the Institute of Medicine's guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment.

Author(s): 
Greenlee, Heather
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Carlson, Linda E.
Cohen, Misha
Deng, Gary
Hershman, Dawn
Mumber, Matthew
Perlmutter, Jane
Seely, Dugald
Sen, Ananda
Zick, Suzanna M.
Tripathy, Debu
Society for Integrative Oncology
Publication Title: 
Psychological Medicine

BACKGROUND: Despite the extensive literature assessing associations between religiosity/spirituality and health, few studies have investigated the clinical applicability of this evidence. The purpose of this paper was to assess the impact of religious/spiritual interventions (RSI) through randomized clinical trials (RCTs). METHOD: A systematic review was performed in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, PsycINFO, Cochrane Collaboration, Embase and SciELO.

Author(s): 
Gonçalves, J. P. B.
Lucchetti, G.
Menezes, P. R.
Vallada, H.

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