Depressive Disorder

Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

OBJECTIVES: To review the evidence for the effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for depression. DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature search using PubMed, PsycLit, the Cochrane Library and previous review papers. DATA SYNTHESIS: Thirty-seven treatments were identified and grouped under the categories of medicines, physical treatments, lifestyle, and dietary changes. We give a description of each treatment, the rationale behind the treatment, a review of studies on effectiveness, and the level of evidence for the effectiveness studies.

Author(s): 
Jorm, Anthony F.
Christensen, Helen
Griffiths, Kathleen M.
Rodgers, Bryan
Publication Title: 
Brain, Behavior, and Immunity

Physical activity (PA) is emerging as a safe and effective tool in the prevention and treatment of psychiatric disorders. PA subtypes include aerobic, resistance, flexibility, neuromotor (involving balance, agility and co-ordination), mind-body (e.g. tai chi, qi gong and yoga) and mixed type trainings. Evidence from clinical trials suggests that PA subtypes can have positive clinical effects, however the effects on the symptomatology may vary according to the PA subtype.

Author(s): 
Eyre, Harris A.
Baune, Bernhard T.
Publication Title: 
Psychosomatics

OBJECTIVE: Of the 34 million adult Americans (17%) using mind-body medicine therapies, 8 million (24%) have anxiety/depression. The evidence for using mind-body therapies to address varying depressive symptoms in populations with and without other chronic comorbidities is reviewed. METHODS: Systematic literature searches of PubMed (Medline), Embase, CINAHL, and the seven databases encompassed by Current Contents, Web of Science, and Web of Knowledge were conducted.

Author(s): 
D'Silva, Sahana
Poscablo, Cristina
Habousha, Racheline
Kogan, Mikhail
Kligler, Benjamin
Publication Title: 
Journal of Affective Disorders

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this review was to investigate the efficacy and safety of yoga interventions in treating patients with major depressive disorder. METHODS: MEDLINE, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library were screened through December 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing yoga to inactive or active comparators in patients with major depressive disorder were eligible. Primary outcomes included remission rates and severity of depression. Anxiety and adverse events were secondary outcomes. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane tool.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Anheyer, Dennis
Lauche, Romy
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
Journal of Affective Disorders

BACKGROUND: Yoga-based interventions may prove to be an attractive option for the treatment of depression. The aim of this study is to systematically review the research evidence on the effectiveness of yoga for this indication. METHODS: Searches of the major biomedical databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, ClNAHL, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library were conducted. Specialist complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and the IndMED databases were also searched and efforts made to identify unpublished and ongoing research. Searches were conducted between January and June 2004.

Author(s): 
Pilkington, Karen
Kirkwood, Graham
Rampes, Hagen
Richardson, Janet
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychiatric Practice

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this article is to review the evidence for the efficacy of hatha yoga for depression and possible mechanisms by which yoga may have an impact on depression, and to outline directions for future research. METHODS: Literature review and synthesis. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A literature search for clinical trials examining yoga for depression uncovered eight trials: 5 including individuals with clinical depression, and 3 for individuals with elevated depression symptoms.

Author(s): 
Uebelacker, Lisa A.
Epstein-Lubow, Gary
Gaudiano, Brandon A.
Tremont, Geoffrey
Battle, Cynthia L.
Miller, Ivan W.
Publication Title: 
Issues in Mental Health Nursing

In the United States, the prevalence of depression is quite high-9% in the general population-with women, young adults, and seniors particularly vulnerable. In recent years, increasing numbers of people are turning to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for relief from depression and other mental health problems. One form of CAM, yoga, has been growing in popularity; this rise in popularity has, in part, been driven by interest in how this practice, with its mindfulness and meditation aspects, may decrease depression.

Author(s): 
Louie, Lila
Publication Title: 
Rhode Island Medical Journal (2013)

There is increasing interest in the use of yoga as way to manage or treat depression and anxiety. Yoga is afford- able, appealing, and accessible for many people, and there are plausible cognitive/affective and biologic mechanisms by which yoga could have a positive impact on depression and anxiety. There is indeed preliminary evidence that yoga may be helpful for these problems, and there are several ongoing larger-scale randomized clinical trials. The current evidence base is strongest for yoga as efficacious in reducing symptoms of unipolar depression.

Author(s): 
Uebelacker, Lisa A.
Broughton, Monica K.
Publication Title: 
Depression and Anxiety

BACKGROUND: Mind-body medical interventions are commonly used to cope with depression and yoga is one of the most commonly used mind-body interventions. The aim of this review was to systematically assess and meta-analyze the effectiveness of yoga for depression. METHODS: Medline/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and IndMED were searched through January 2013. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of yoga for patients with depressive disorders and individuals with elevated levels of depression were included.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Langhorst, Jost
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

CONTEXT: The purpose of this critical review is to examine the role of staging in planning a psychotherapeutic intervention in depressive disorders. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: English-language studies concerned with staging in depressive disorders were identified in MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Web of Science and by manual search of the literature. Selection of articles was based on their methodological quality and implications for clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Guidi, Jenny
Tomba, Elena
Cosci, Fiammetta
Park, Seung K.
Fava, Giovanni A.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Depressive Disorder