Diazepam

Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Conversion disorder is an alteration or loss of physical functioning suggestive of a physical disorder that is thought to be due to a psychological stressor or conflict. The fact that many theories about the cause of conversion disorder focus on psychological and social factors would suggest that a psychosocial intervention might be of most benefit. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the efficacy of psychosocial interventions on people diagnosed with conversion disorder compared with standard care, a biological intervention or another psychosocial intervention.

Author(s): 
Ruddy, R.
House, A.
Publication Title: 
General Dentistry

Overcoming denial and admitting to having a chemical dependency problem is a hurdle that is extraordinarily difficult for anyone to handle without professional assistance. Addicted health care professionals often become even more deeply enmeshed in denial of their problem. They refuse help because they see themselves as educated beyond the level of those who are attempting to help them, and because they fear professional humiliation. Dental professionals who become aware of a colleague's chemical dependence, have an ethical duty to intervene in a constructive way.

Author(s): 
Chiodo, G. T.
Tolle, S. W.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Psychiatry
Author(s): 
Dean, S. R.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Trauma

In this study, intravenous diazepam was a convenient, safe, and entirely adequate replacement of anesthesia for orthopaedia manipulations. It was administered in the hospital emergency room to both healthy and ill patients. A wide age range of patients was treated, and many very difficult reductions were accomplished. It is the author's firm opinion, however, that the physician using this technique should be capable of using emergency respiratory resuscitation equipment and that such equipment should be immediately available.

Author(s): 
Gunther, S. F.
Usnr, L. M.
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the Western Pharmacology Society
Author(s): 
Kott, K.
Winters, W. D.
Publication Title: 
Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica

A simplified, safe and flexible technique of anesthesia, based on a limited number of relatively cheap drugs, and allowing ventilation with air, was applied to 60 patients undergoing operations of at least 60 minutes' duration. The required depth of hypnosis was produced by intravenous diazepam or gamma-OH, whilst droperidol and fentanyl provided a satisfactory degree of sedation and analgesia. Pancuronium bromide was used for muscle relaxation. Spontaneous respiration was resumed immediately after postoperative use of nalorphine and neostigmine.

Author(s): 
Lelkens, J. P.
Publication Title: 
Nihon Yakurigaku Zasshi. Folia Pharmacologica Japonica

The effects of oral administration of clonazepam, a new benzodiazepine derivative (F. Hoffmann-La Roche), on the central nervous system were compared with those of diazepam and several anticonvulsants in mice and rats. 1) Clonazepam exhibited a moderate inhibitory effect on the locomotor activity observed with open-field situation in mice and no effect in rats, while it inhibited markedly the rearing behavior in both animals, the duration of action being approximately six hours.

Author(s): 
Ono, N.
Furukawa, T.
Publication Title: 
Lancet (London, England)
Author(s): 
Sutherland, R. J.
Knox, J.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Author(s): 
Stern, J. A.
Brown, M.
Ulett, G. A.
Sletten, I.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

Under randomized double-blind conditions, 1.00 to 1.67 mg of intravenous physostigmine (Antilirium) reversed sleep induced by administration of 0.102 to 0.238 mg/kg body weight of intravenous diazepam in eight healthy human volunteers. Awakening occurred 330 to 740s after initiation of the physostigmine infusion at a rate of 0.5 mg/min every 4 min. Diazepam plasma levels were not significantly different at the start of either the physostigmine or placebo infusion. Physostigmine did not effect plasma binding of diazepam.

Author(s): 
Avant, G. R.
Speeg, K. V.
Freemon, F. R.
Schenker, S.
Berman, M. L.

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