Diet, Reducing

Publication Title: 
NestlÈ Nutrition Workshop Series. Paediatric Programme

The focus here is on research involving long-term calorie restriction (CR) to prevent or delay the incidence of the metabolic syndrome with age. The current societal environment is marked by overabundant accessibility of food coupled with a strong trend to reduced physical activity, both leading to the development of a constellation of disorders including central obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension (metabolic syndrome). Prolonged CR has been shown to extend median and maximal lifespan in a variety of lower species (yeast, worms, fish, rats, and mice).

Author(s): 
Ravussin, Eric
Redman, Leanne M.
Publication Title: 
Age (Dordrecht, Netherlands)

Dietary restriction (DR) increases lifespan in a range of evolutionarily distinct species. The polyphenol resveratrol may be a dietary mimetic of some effects of DR. The pivotal role of the mammalian histone deacetylase (HDAC) Sirt1, and its homologue in other organisms, in mediating the effects of both DR and resveratrol on lifespan/ageing suggests it may be the common conduit through which these dietary interventions influence ageing.

Author(s): 
Wakeling, Luisa A.
Ions, Laura J.
Ford, Dianne
Publication Title: 
Mechanisms of Ageing and Development

Dietary restriction (DR) delays or prevents age-related diseases and extends lifespan in species ranging from yeast to primates. Although the applicability of this regimen to humans remains uncertain, a proportional response would add more healthy years to the average life than even a cure for cancer or heart disease. Because it is unlikely that many would be willing or able to maintain a DR lifestyle, there has been intense interest in mimicking its beneficial effects on health, and potentially longevity, with drugs.

Author(s): 
Baur, Joseph A.
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Dietary restriction extends lifespan in many organisms, but little is known about how it affects hematophagous arthropods. We demonstrated that diet restriction during either larval or adult stages extends Aedes aegypti lifespan. A. aegypti females fed either single or no blood meals survived 30-40% longer than those given weekly blood meals. However, mosquitoes given weekly blood meals produced far more eggs.

Author(s): 
Joy, Teresa K.
Arik, Anam J.
Corby-Harris, Vanessa
Johnson, Adiv A.
Riehle, Michael A.
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Dietary restriction (DR) has been used for decades to retard aging in rodents, but its mechanism of action remains an enigma. A principal roadblock has been that DR affects many different processes, making it difficult to distinguish cause and effect. To address this problem, we applied a quantitative genetics approach utilizing the ILSXISS series of mouse recombinant inbred strains. Across 42 strains, mean female lifespan ranged from 380 to 1070days on DR (fed 60% of ad libitum [AL]) and from 490 to 1020days on an AL diet.

Author(s): 
Rikke, Brad A.
Liao, Chen-Yu
McQueen, Matthew B.
Nelson, James F.
Johnson, Thomas E.
Publication Title: 
Revista Brasileira De Medicina
Author(s): 
RÛiz, J.
Publication Title: 
L'AnnÈe Endocrinologique
Author(s): 
Albeaux-Fernet, M.
Bellot, L.
Canet, L.
Deribreux, J.
Gelinet, M.
Publication Title: 
Polski Tygodnik Lekarski (Warsaw, Poland: 1960)
Author(s): 
Zakowska-Wachelko, B.
Publication Title: 
Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology

Many children with muscular dystrophy are overweight, and although weight control is pursued in some centres it is unusual to encourage severe dietary restriction for fear that it might lead to accelerated loss of muscle. In this study, two overweight boys with muscular dystrophy were monitored by whole-body nitrogen balance, total body potassium, strength and functional measurements during calorie restriction.

Author(s): 
Edwards, R. H.
Round, J. M.
Jackson, M. J.
Griffiths, R. D.
Lilburn, M. F.
Publication Title: 
Clinics in Geriatric Medicine

Maximum life span can be increased by dietary modulation in rodents to a degree well beyond what is seen in "normal" laboratory animals, and probably well beyond the "potential" that wildlife animals might achieve if predation could be eliminated. With a fairly high order of probability, the same might be obtained in humans. There is no reason to insist that maximum life span in humans is irretrievably fixed.

Author(s): 
Walford, R. L.

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