Disclosure

Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

Although research on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies is still limited, systematic reviews have revealed sufficient evidence to conclude that CAM can be effective for certain conditions. In this article we discuss clinicians' responsibilities to inform parents/patients about CAM alternatives and use the example of acupuncture for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting remain significant adverse effects of cancer therapy, and some patients cannot find relief with standard therapies.

Author(s): 
Gilmour, Joan
Harrison, Christine
Asadi, Leyla
Cohen, Michael H.
Vohra, Sunita
Publication Title: 
Health Affairs (Project Hope)

Communicating openly and honestly with patients and families about unexpected medical events-a policy known as full disclosure-improves outcomes for patients and providers. Although many certification and licensing organizations have declared full disclosure to be imperative, the adoption of and adherence to a full disclosure protocol is not common practice in most clinical settings. We conducted a case study of Ascension Health's implementation of a full disclosure protocol at five labor and delivery demonstration sites.

Author(s): 
Hendrich, Ann
McCoy, Christine Kocot
Gale, Jane
Sparkman, Lora
Santos, Palmira
Publication Title: 
Journal of Traumatic Stress

In recent years, reports of institutional abuse within the Catholic Church have emerged and research on the consequences on mental health is in its beginnings. In this study, we report findings on current mental health and resilience in a sample of adult survivors of institutional abuse (N = 185). We compared 3 groups of survivors that differed regarding their current mental health to investigate aspects of resilience, coping, and disclosure. The majority of the sample was male (76.2%), the mean age was 56.28 (SD = 9.46) years, and more than 50.0% of the sample was cohabiting/married.

Author(s): 
Lueger-Schuster, Brigitte
Weindl, Dina
Kantor, Viktoria
Knefel, Matthias
Gl¸ck, Tobias
Moy, Yvonne
Butollo, Asisa
Jagsch, Reinhold
Publication Title: 
Medical Care

Voluntary informed consent is a hard problem--one that inheres in the domain of research. The standard definition requires four criteria for consent to be morally valid: disclosure, understanding, voluntariness, and competence. These standards apply across the continuum of activities that comprise research. This paper concentrates on consent for the desperately sick, for whom enrollment in a research trial represents the last best hope of rescue. The literature indicates that many of these subjects enroll in research on the basis of feelings of hope or trust.

Author(s): 
Bosk, Charles L.
Publication Title: 
Medical Care

Voluntary informed consent is a hard problem--one that inheres in the domain of research. The standard definition requires four criteria for consent to be morally valid: disclosure, understanding, voluntariness, and competence. These standards apply across the continuum of activities that comprise research. This paper concentrates on consent for the desperately sick, for whom enrollment in a research trial represents the last best hope of rescue. The literature indicates that many of these subjects enroll in research on the basis of feelings of hope or trust.

Author(s): 
Bosk, Charles L.
Publication Title: 
Lancet (London, England)

In a random sample of 262 deaths, 21% of the patients lived alone and a quarter of the caring relatives were over 70 years old. The difficulties of the relatives were more often a cause for hospital admission than those of the patients. Health professionals and relatives differed considerably in their assessment of the same case. 24% of relatives were especially grateful to their general practitioners but 37% were critical. The uncaring attitude of the hospitals was criticised by 27% of the relatives, although hospital nurses were the most praised of all professionals.

Author(s): 
Wilkes, E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Interpersonal Violence

Research on domestic violence against women has increased considerably over the past few decades. Most participants in such studies find the exercise worthwhile and of greater benefit than emotional cost; however, systematic examination of participant reaction to research on violence is considerably lacking, especially in the Middle East region. This study begins to fill this gap by examining women's reactions to domestic violence research in Jordan and whether a personal history of violence is associated with unfavorable experiences.

Author(s): 
Clark, Cari Jo
Shahrouri, Manal
Halasa, Louma
Khalaf, Inaam
Spencer, Rachael
Everson-Rose, Susan
Publication Title: 
Memory (Hove, England)

This paper investigates the identity implications of silence about genocide in commemorations of American Thanksgiving. In Study 1 we assessed the co-occurrence of national glorification themes with different forms of silence in commemoration products by conducting a content analysis of presidential Thanksgiving proclamations.

Author(s): 
Kurti?, Tu?Áe
Adams, Glenn
Bird, Michael Yellow
Publication Title: 
Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics

After a 16-week clinical trial of a new anti-inflammatory drug, the participants were given a factual test to determine whether they had understood and remembered the information given them when consent was solicited. They filled out a questionnaire about their reasons for volunteering and their views on clinical studies and on medical practice in general. Demographic information was also obtained. Two thirds of the participants did not remember that they had been informed about potential risk (gastrointestinal ulceration).

Author(s): 
Hassar, M.
Weintraub, M.
Publication Title: 
Women's Health Issues: Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health

Referral patterns of physicians have a direct impact upon the care of patients, particularly in obstetrics and gynecology. The choice of referral is influenced by the history of specialization, physician altruism, and intricate patterns of financial conflicts of interest. The conflicts of interest are further obscured by the lack of clear definition of roles and responsibilities for generalist, specialist, and subspecialist. Alternate patterns for referral based on financial incentives or directed referral care plans are reviewed to examine the potential conflicts of interest.

Author(s): 
Cain, J. M.
Jonsen, A. R.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Disclosure