Dissection

Publication Title: 
Clinical Anatomy (New York, N.Y.)

It is remarkable that the famous ÈcorchÈs of HonorÈ Fragonard have survived the centuries to reach us today. Studies carried out by several teams have established details of the technique used by Fragonard that help to explain their longevity. The injection of the vessels was achieved by means of a mixture of mutton tallow and pine resin diluted in essence of turpentine and essential oils. This gave Fragonard a very high success rate. Above all, he did not add pigments to his mixture while injecting the veins, and this facilitated the procedure.

Author(s): 
Degueurce, Christophe
vo Duy, Sung
Bleton, Jean
Hugon, Paulette
Cadot, Laure
Tchapla, Alain
Adds, Philip
Publication Title: 
Anatomical Sciences Education

Many anatomy programs that incorporate dissection of donated human bodies hold memorial ceremonies of gratitude towards body donors. The content of these ceremonies may include learners' reflections on mortality, respect, altruism, and personal growth told through various humanities modalities. The task of planning is usually student- and faculty-led with participation from other health care students. Objective information on current memorial ceremonies for body donors in anatomy programs in the United States appears to be lacking.

Author(s): 
Jones, Trahern W.
Lachman, Nirusha
Pawlina, Wojciech
Publication Title: 
Lancet (London, England)

We report a survey in the UK of potential whole-body donors for dissection. 218 people (age range 19-97 years) answered a postal questionnaire, giving information about themselves, their reasons for donation, attitudes towards the dead body, funeral preferences and medical giving and receiving. In addition to altruism, motives included the wish to avoid funeral ceremonies, to avoid waste, and in a few cases, to evade the expense of a funeral. 44% understood that their bodies would be used as teaching material, 42% for experiments.

Author(s): 
Richardson, R.
Hurwitz, B.
Publication Title: 
Anatomical Sciences Education

Professionalism is a core competency of medical training that requires students to develop the skills of providing and receiving feedback. Our study evaluated the effectiveness of delivering feedback in a group setting compared with an individual setting. The first-year class of Mayo medical students (n = 49) enrolled in gross anatomy (in dissection teams), completed weekly anonymous evaluations of themselves and their teammates regarding seven aspects of professionalism (altruism, compassion, respect, honesty/integrity, responsibility, commitment to excellence, and self-reflection).

Author(s): 
Camp, Christopher L.
Gregory, Jeremy K.
Lachman, Nirusha
Chen, Laura P.
Juskewitch, Justin E.
Pawlina, Wojciech
Publication Title: 
Anatomical Sciences Education

The psychosocial impact of human dissection on the lives of medical and health science students has been noted. To assess the impact of the dissection room experience on one's willingness to become a whole body and organ donor, the attitudes of 1,350 students and professionals from the medical, health, and non-health related disciplines to body and organ donation were studied. The participants were broken into categories according to degree of exposure to human dissection.

Author(s): 
Anyanwu, Emeka G.
Obikili, Emmanuel N.
Agu, Augustine U.
Publication Title: 
Anatomical Sciences Education

Many anatomy programs that incorporate dissection of donated human bodies hold memorial ceremonies of gratitude towards body donors. The content of these ceremonies may include learners' reflections on mortality, respect, altruism, and personal growth told through various humanities modalities. The task of planning is usually student- and faculty-led with participation from other health care students. Objective information on current memorial ceremonies for body donors in anatomy programs in the United States appears to be lacking.

Author(s): 
Jones, Trahern W.
Lachman, Nirusha
Pawlina, Wojciech
Publication Title: 
Anatomical Sciences Education

Considerable attention is being given to the availability of bodies for anatomical education. This raises the question of the manner in which they are obtained, that is, whether they are unclaimed or donated. With increasing emphasis upon the ethical desirability of using body bequests, the spotlight tends to be focused on those countries with factors that militate against donations. However, little attention has been paid to cultures where donations are readily available. One such country is Sri Lanka where the majority of the Buddhist population follows Theravada Buddhism.

Author(s): 
Subasinghe, Sandeepani Kanchana
Jones, D. Gareth
Publication Title: 
Spine

STUDY DESIGN: Serial dissection of porcine motion segments during robotic control of vertebral kinematics. OBJECTIVE: To identify which spinal tissues are loaded in response to manual therapy (manipulation and mobilization) and to what magnitude. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Various theoretical constructs attempt to explain how manual therapies load specific spinal tissues.

Author(s): 
Kawchuk, Gregory N.
Carrasco, Alejandro
Beecher, Grayson
Goertzen, Darrell
Prasad, Narasimha
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

Gross dissection anatomical studies have investigated the course of the human lumbar posterior primary ramus and its branches. This nerve has frequently been associated with low back pain; however, the cross-sectional area of the space beneath the mamillo-accessory ligament, which is occupied by the medial branch of the posterior primary ramus, has not been clearly defined.

Author(s): 
Lynton, G. F.
Giles, D. C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

An extraforaminal ligament bisecting the L5/S1 intervertebral foramen and known as the corporotransverse ligament was studied in 15 adult embalmed cadavers. Its relationship to the L5 ventral ramus, sympathetic chain and gray ramus communicans was observed and recorded. The corporotransverse ligament has been implicated as a site for potential entrapment of the L5 nerve. The purpose of this study was to determine if the ligament could be detected radiographically. A single sample spine containing the ligament was hemisected and the neural, vascular and adipose tissue removed.

Author(s): 
Church, C. P.
Buehler, M. T.

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