Dissent and Disputes

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Nursing & Midwifery

Orthodox medicine generally demands evidence in the form of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) before accepting the value of a particular therapy/intervention from the CAM field. Yet many RCTs are badly executed as they are carried out by doctors or scientists rather than holistic practitioners, and peer reviewers for conventional medical journals may not have sufficient knowledge to be able to assess a CAM paper properly. This article discusses inadequacies found in RCTs and other papers related to CAM, and pinpoints how research should be critically evaluated and reviewed.

Author(s): 
Veal, Lowana
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Nursing & Midwifery

Orthodox medicine generally demands evidence in the form of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) before accepting the value of a particular therapy/intervention from the CAM field. Yet many RCTs are badly executed as they are carried out by doctors or scientists rather than holistic practitioners, and peer reviewers for conventional medical journals may not have sufficient knowledge to be able to assess a CAM paper properly. This article discusses inadequacies found in RCTs and other papers related to CAM, and pinpoints how research should be critically evaluated and reviewed.

Author(s): 
Veal, Lowana
Publication Title: 
The Washington Post
Author(s): 
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Disagreement over the legitimacy of direct sterilization continues within Catholic moral debate, with painful and at times confusing ramifications for Catholic healthcare systems. This paper argues that the medical profession should be construed as a key moral authority in this debate, on two grounds. First, the recent revival of neo-Aristotelianism in moral philosophy as applied to medical ethics has brought out the inherently moral dimensions of the history and current practice of medicine.

Author(s): 
Cowdin, Daniel M.
Tuohey, John F.
Publication Title: 
Cambridge quarterly of healthcare ethics: CQ: the international journal of healthcare ethics committees

Recently the scope of protections afforded those healthcare professionals and institutions that refuse to provide certain interventions on the grounds of conscience have expanded, in some instances insulating providers (institutional and individual) from any liability or sanction for harms that patients experience as a result.

Author(s): 
Rich, Ben A.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Orthodox bioethics is distinctive in how it reflects on issues in bioethics. This distinctiveness is found in the relationship of spirituality and liturgy to ethics. Eber's essay, however, treats the distinctiveness as absolute uniqueness. In so focusing on the incommensurability of Orthodox bioethics Eber fails to tell his reader what Orthodox bioethics is about. Furthermore, his description of Western Christian ethics is seriously inaccurate.

Author(s): 
Keenan, James F.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Roman Catholic bioethics seems to be caught in a paradox. On the one hand it is committed to the natural law tradition and the power of reason to understand the structures of creation and the moral law. On the other hand there is a greater and greater appeal to Scripture and revelation. The tradition maintains that reason is capable of understanding the rational structures of reality and that ethics is properly built on metaphysics. In this way ethics, bioethics, is non-sectarian.

Author(s): 
Smith, Russell E.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Clinical Ethics

How might clinicians best try to retain the trust of patients and family members after clinicians oppose giving a treatment? If clinicians can maintain the trust of patients and families in these situations, this may soften what may be the greatest possible loss--the death of a loved one. I discuss what clinicians seeking to retain trust should not do--namely impose their values and reason wrongly--and introduce strategies that clinicians may use to reduce both. I present five principles that clinicians can follow to try to retain trust, with examples that illustrate each.

Author(s): 
Howe, Edmund G.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of medical practice management: MPM

Tact is the ability to speak to others in a manner that is not offensive or hurtful of others' feelings. Practices should coach staff on verbiage and body language that encourage respect, kindness, and understanding. Being sensitive to the feelings of others is a skill that everyone should develop.

Author(s): 
Weinstock, Donna
Publication Title: 
Nursing Inquiry

The tremendous growth in nursing literature about spirituality has garnered proportionately little critique. Part of the reason may be that the broad generalizing claims typical of this literature have not been sufficiently explicated so that their particular implications for a practice discipline could be evaluated. Further, conceptualizations that attempt to encompass all possible views are difficult to challenge outside of a particular location.

Author(s): 
Pesut, Barbara
Fowler, Marsha
Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl
Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston
Sawatzky, Rick

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