District of Columbia

Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Ethnicity & Disease

Despite the recognized role diet plays in disease, health, and longevity, less than half the US population consumes the desired 5 fruit/ vegetable servings a day. What accounts for the disjunction between cognition and behavior? Telephone survey data from a probability sample of 308 metropolitan Washington, DC, residents confirm the contingent consistency hypothesis as one explanation. The hypothesis suggests that optimal beliefs about health outcomes of dietary intake motivate optimal dietary intake, contingent on social structural experiences.

Author(s): 
Manuel, Ron Carmichael
Publication Title: 
The Journal of School Nursing: The Official Publication of the National Association of School Nurses

The purpose of this article is to outline the process, content, and evaluation of a 14-week health education program for 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students in an inner city Catholic grade school who are at risk for multiple health problems. The process includes a needs assessment with findings, followed by construction of an age-appropriate program. A content outline displays the topics and information presented to the students. In conclusion, an evaluation presents the results and effectiveness of the program.

Author(s): 
Legg, Katherine
Grigoriev, Lana
Publication Title: 
Psychological Science

Did Americans change following the September 11 terrorist attacks? We provide a tentative answer with respect to the positive traits included in the Values in Action Classification of Strengths and measured with a self-report questionnaire available on-line and completed by 4,817 respondents.

Author(s): 
Peterson, Christopher
Seligman, Martin E. P.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Science

Did Americans change following the September 11 terrorist attacks? We provide a tentative answer with respect to the positive traits included in the Values in Action Classification of Strengths and measured with a self-report questionnaire available on-line and completed by 4,817 respondents.

Author(s): 
Peterson, Christopher
Seligman, Martin E. P.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Religion and Health

This study of malevolent narcissism examines the relationship between the Washington Snipers, Muhammad and Malvo, from the perspectives of attachment theory and Kleinian theory. Muhammad embodied a perverted understanding of manliness. Malvo was desperate for the love of a father, and fused with the omnipotent destructiveness of John Muhammad. Together they embarked on a failed Quest, recreating the original infant/caregiver scenario, which in their experience was about destruction and death, rather than gratitude and life.

Author(s): 
Somerstein, Lynn
Publication Title: 
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion

Using data from a 2001–2002 sample of adults aged 65 and older living in the Washington, DC metropolitan area, we examine the associations among religious involvement (as measured by the frequency of attendance at religious services and praying), the belief in divine control, and the sense of mattering—a key component of the self-concept. We also assess the extent to which these patterns vary by gender, race, and education. Findings indicate indirect effects of religious attendance on mattering through divine control beliefs and the frequency of social contact.

Author(s): 
Schieman, Scott
Bierman, Alex
Ellison, Christopher G.

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