Dogs

Publication Title: 
Journal of Experimental Animal Science

The experimental production of a myocardial infarction (MI) in the dog was achieved adopting a new catheter technique. After induction of the MI, a variety of arrhythmias appeared and were classified according to the Lown-classification as more or less severe. The therapy was achieved with antiarrhythmics class 1-111 (Vaughn-Williams classification) for late premature ventricular beats or couplets. Sinus tachycardia was often terminated by occular or sinus carotis pressure or a new selective sinus blocking agent.

Author(s): 
Beyer, M.
Hoffer, H.
Eggeling, T.
Mierdl, S.
Beyer, U.
Hannekum, A.
Publication Title: 
Tijdschrift Voor Diergeneeskunde

This article reviews the present state of the art of resuscitation of dogs and cats. The purpose of resuscitation is to revive animals so that the vital functions resume together with a normal brain function. Resuscitation must be started as soon as the cardiopulmonary arrest has been confirmed. Adequate ventilation and effective circulation to the most vital body organs, the heart and the brain, have the highest priority.

Author(s): 
How, K. L.
Reens, N.
Stokhof, A. A.
Hellebrekers, L. J.
Publication Title: 
Anesthesia and Analgesia

There is no information comparing the ability to reverse the cardiotoxic effects associated with incremental overdosage of bupivacaine (BUP) to levobupivacaine (LBUP), ropivacaine (ROP), or lidocaine (LIDO). Open-chest dogs were randomized to receive incremental escalating infusions of BUP, LBUP, ROP, and LIDO to the point of cardiovascular collapse (mean arterial pressure [MAP] < or = 45 mm Hg). Hypotension and arrhythmias were treated with epinephrine, open-chest massage, and advanced cardiac life support protocols, respectively.

Author(s): 
Groban, L.
Deal, D. D.
Vernon, J. C.
James, R. L.
Butterworth, J.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Techniques in Small Animal Practice

Successful fracture management accomplishes 2 major objectives: bony union and return to functional activities. For many years, Physical Therapy has routinely helped human patients recovering from fractures reach their functional goals by helping them regain movement, flexibility, strength, coordination, and balance. Rehabilitation is now commonly provided to small animals recovering from fractures to accomplish similar goals. Knowledge of tissue healing is critical when determining the appropriate stresses to apply throughout the healing timeline.

Author(s): 
Doyle, Nancy D.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Techniques in Small Animal Practice

Physical therapy is commonly used postoperatively in humans to decrease pain, inflammation and recovery time. The same goals can be achieved in our veterinary patients using similar modalities such as; cryotherapy, passive range of motion, massage, transcutaneous electrical stimulation and low-level light laser therapy. When used in the first 48 hours following surgery, the reduction in pain, increased mobility, and decreased inflammation will aid in early return to normal function. Applied appropriately these treatments have both immediate and long term benefits.

Author(s): 
Shumway, Renee
Publication Title: 
Annals of Emergency Medicine

The efficacy of bystander CPR in resuscitation from cardiac arrest when defibrillation is available within five to six minutes has been questioned. Epidemiologic studies from different cities have shown conflicting results. We conducted a study to determine the effect of early CPR versus no CPR on resuscitability, 24-hour survival, and neurologic deficit in an animal model of cardiac arrest. Twenty-two mongrel dogs were subjected to five minutes of electrically induced ventricular fibrillation.

Author(s): 
Sanders, A. B.
Kern, K. B.
Bragg, S.
Ewy, G. A.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Techniques in Small Animal Practice

Physical therapy is commonly used postoperatively in humans to decrease pain, inflammation and recovery time. The same goals can be achieved in our veterinary patients using similar modalities such as; cryotherapy, passive range of motion, massage, transcutaneous electrical stimulation and low-level light laser therapy. When used in the first 48 hours following surgery, the reduction in pain, increased mobility, and decreased inflammation will aid in early return to normal function. Applied appropriately these treatments have both immediate and long term benefits.

Author(s): 
Shumway, Renee
Publication Title: 
The British Homoeopathic Journal

Forty-one cases of Cushing's Disease affecting both equine and canine patients were treated with an identical mixture of two homeopathically prepared remedies (ACTH 30c and Quercus robur 30c), and the clinical improvements seen in the cases assessed. Homeopathy has been described as a medicine that can only be prescribed on the basis of individual symptoms shown, fitting the remedy to the patient, not the disease.

Author(s): 
Elliott, M.
Publication Title: 
The Veterinary Record

Twenty dogs with confirmed atopic dermatitis were treated with homeopathy. In the first phase of this pilot study, all of the dogs were treated by a veterinary homeopath with individualised remedies prescribed on the basis of the dog's cutaneous signs and constitutional characteristics. The response to treatment was assessed by scoring the severity of pruritus from 0 to 10 on a validated scale. The dogs were evaluated at monthly intervals for at least two months. In 15 cases, the owners reported no improvement following homeopathic treatment.

Author(s): 
Hill, P. B.
Hoare, J.
Lau-Gillard, P.
Rybnicek, J.
Mathie, R. T.
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

INTRODUCTION: The peer-review literature contains no controlled clinical research of homeopathy in cats and very little in dogs. MAIN OBJECTIVE: To collect clinical outcomes data systematically from individualised homeopathic treatment of cats and dogs that would help to inform controlled research in feline and canine homeopathy. METHODS: Twenty-one homeopathic veterinary surgeons recorded data systematically from consecutive feline and canine patients over a 12-month period.

Author(s): 
Mathie, Robert T.
Baitson, Elizabeth S.
Hansen, Lise
Elliott, Mark F.
Hoare, John

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