Dose-Response Relationship, Drug

Publication Title: 
Human & Experimental Toxicology
Author(s): 
Sprott, R. L.
Publication Title: 
Human & Experimental Toxicology
Author(s): 
Wilson, R.
Publication Title: 
Biogerontology

The possibility is discussed that dietary restriction modulates ageing and onset of related pathologies by, in addition to upregulation of proteolysis, suppression of glycolysis which in turn decreases generation of methylglyoxal (MG), a highly toxic glycating agent which can provoke cellular senescence and many age-related pathologies. This proposal is supported by the observation that intermittent feeding can mimic dietary restriction's effects on mouse lifespan without any overall reduction in calorie intake.

Author(s): 
Hipkiss, Alan R.
Publication Title: 
Ageing Research Reviews

The impact of dietary factors on health and longevity is increasingly appreciated. The most prominent dietary factor that affects the risk of many different chronic diseases is energy intake -- excessive calorie intake increases the risk. Reducing energy intake by controlled caloric restriction or intermittent fasting increases lifespan and protects various tissues against disease, in part, by hormesis mechanisms that increase cellular stress resistance. Some specific dietary components may also exert health benefits by inducing adaptive cellular stress responses.

Author(s): 
Mattson, Mark P.
Publication Title: 
Ageing Research Reviews

Hormesis in aging is represented by mild stress-induced stimulation of protective mechanisms in cells and organisms resulting in biologically beneficial effects. Single or multiple exposure to low doses of otherwise harmful agents, such as irradiation, food limitation, heat stress, hypergravity, reactive oxygen species and other free radicals have a variety of anti-aging and longevity-extending hormetic effects.

Author(s): 
Rattan, Suresh I. S.
Publication Title: 
Cell Metabolism

Hormesis refers to the beneficial effects of a treatment that at a higher intensity is harmful. In one form of hormesis, sublethal exposure to stressors induces a response that results in stress resistance. The principle of stress-response hormesis is increasingly finding application in studies of aging, where hormetic increases in life span have been seen in several animal models.

Author(s): 
Gems, David
Partridge, Linda
Publication Title: 
Journal of Dentistry

OBJECTIVES: This double blind randomized clinical trial evaluated the longevity of the whitening effect (6-month follow-up) of two carbamide peroxide concentrations used in at-home vital bleaching. METHODS: Ninety-two volunteers with shade mean C1 or darker for the six maxillary anterior teeth were randomized into two balanced groups (n=46) according to bleaching agent concentration: 10% (CP10) or 16% (CP16) carbamide peroxide. Patients were instructed to use the whitening agent in a tray for 2h/day during 3 weeks.

Author(s): 
Meireles, S. S.
Heckmann, S. S.
Santos, I. S.
Della Bona, A.
Demarco, F. F.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nutrition

Many hypotheses of disease risk and prevention depend on inferences about the metabolic effects of fructose; however, there is inadequate attention to dose dependency. Fructose is proving to have bidirectional effects. At moderate or high doses, an effect on any one marker may be absent or even the opposite of that observed at very high or excessive doses; examples include fasting plasma triglyceride, insulin sensitivity, and the putative marker uric acid.

Author(s): 
Livesey, Geoffrey
Publication Title: 
Journal of Dentistry

OBJECTIVES: This double-blind randomized clinical trial aimed to evaluate the whitening effect of two at-home tooth bleaching agents and the effect of dietary habits after 2 years. The patients' view about bleaching longevity was also investigated. METHODS: Ninety-two subjects with mean shade of C1 or darker for the six maxillary anterior teeth were randomized into two groups (n=46) according to the carbamide peroxide (CP) concentration: 10% (CP10) or 16% (CP16). The treatment was performed using the whitening agent in a tray for 2h/day during 3 weeks.

Author(s): 
Meireles, S. S.
Santos, I. S.
Bona, A. Della
Demarco, F. F.
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

We tested the effects of a Class I histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDAcI), sodium butyrate (NaBu), on the longevity of normal- and long-lived strains of Drosophila melanogaster. This HDAcI has mixed effects in the normal-lived Ra strain as it decreases mortality rates and increases longevity when administered in the transition or senescent spans, but decreases longevity when administered over the health span only or over the entire adult lifespan. Mostly deleterious effects are noted when administered by either method to the long-lived La strain.

Author(s): 
McDonald, Philip
Maizi, Brian M.
Arking, Robert

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