Double-Blind Method

Publication Title: 
Obstetrics and Gynecology

OBJECTIVE: To describe the effects of six interventions for menopausal vasomotor symptoms relative to control in a pooled analysis, facilitating translation of the results for clinicians and symptomatic women. The Menopause Strategies: Finding Lasting Answers for Symptoms and Health network tested these interventions in three randomized clinical trials. METHODS: An analysis of pooled individual-level data from three randomized clinical trials is presented. Participants were 899 perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with at least 14 bothersome vasomotor symptoms per week.

Author(s): 
Guthrie, Katherine A.
LaCroix, Andrea Z.
Ensrud, Kristine E.
Joffe, Hadine
Newton, Katherine M.
Reed, Susan D.
Caan, Bette
Carpenter, Janet S.
Cohen, Lee S.
Freeman, Ellen W.
Larson, Joseph C.
Manson, JoAnn E.
Rexrode, Kathy
Skaar, Todd C.
Sternfeld, Barbara
Anderson, Garnet L.
Publication Title: 
Presse Medicale (Paris, France: 1983)

OBJECTIVE: Hypnosis is widely used in medicine and dentistry, but many practitioners still consider it as a mysterious technique. Thus, a systematic review was conducted to assess the effects of hypnosis during dental treatment. METHODS: A literature search was conducted on PubMed (1981-2012) to retrieve references, written in French or English, reporting controlled clinical studies that have evaluated any type of hypnosis. The quality of included studies was assessed by evaluating randomisation, blindness and drop-outs.

Author(s): 
Jugé, Charlène
Tubert-Jeannin, Stéphanie
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

BACKGROUND: The claims made for the clinical effects of homeopathy are controversial. The results of several meta-analyses of clinical trials are positive, but they fail in general to highlight specific medical conditions that respond well to homeopathy.

Author(s): 
Mathie, R. T.
Publication Title: 
Forschende Komplementarmedizin (2006)

Though homeopathy has been in successful and continuous use for well over 200 years, in the United Kingdom it is under growing pressure, from scientific detractors and sections of the media. As such, homeopathy's free National Health Service provision is threatened because it is derided as 'unproven', 'unscientific', and even 'deadly'. While refuting these and other detractions, this paper considers possible reasons for the current plight of homeopathy UK.

Author(s): 
Milgrom, Lionel R.
Publication Title: 
BMJ (Clinical research ed.)

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that homoeopathy is a placebo by examining its effect in patients with allergic rhinitis and so contest the evidence from three previous trials in this series. DESIGN: Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, parallel group, multicentre study. SETTING: Four general practices and a hospital ear, nose, and throat outpatient department. PARTICIPANTS: 51 patients with perennial allergic rhinitis. INTERVENTION: Random assignment to an oral 30c homoeopathic preparation of principal inhalant allergen or to placebo.

Author(s): 
Taylor, M. A.
Reilly, D.
Llewellyn-Jones, R. H.
McSharry, C.
Aitchison, T. C.
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Prevalence estimates of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) vary according to the diagnostic criteria used and the population sampled. DSM-IV prevalence estimates among school children in the US are 3% to 5%, but other estimates vary from 1.7% to 16.0%. No objective test exists to confirm the diagnosis of ADHD, which remains a clinical diagnosis. Other conditions frequently co-exist with ADHD.

Author(s): 
Keen, Daphne
Hadijikoumi, Irene
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health

As a therapeutic intervention, homeopathy is the target of increased scepticism because in the main, its remedies are diluted and succussed (potentized) out of material existence. This puts homeopathy seemingly at odds with the paradigm of conventional science, in particular, that atoms and molecules are the fundamental building blocks of all matter. Accordingly, homeopathy cannot work, so that any reported beneficial effects must, at best, be due to the placebo effect.

Author(s): 
Milgrom, Lionel R.
Publication Title: 
Lancet (London, England)

We tested, under independent conditions, the reproducibility of evidence from two previous trials that homoeopathy differs from placebo. The test model was again homoeopathic immunotherapy. 28 patients with allergic asthma, most of them sensitive to house-dust mite, were randomly allocated to receive either oral homoeopathic immunotherapy to their principal allergen or identical placebo. The test treatments were given as a complement to their unaltered conventional care. A daily visual analogue scale of overall symptom intensity was the outcome measure.

Author(s): 
Reilly, D.
Taylor, M. A.
Beattie, N. G.
Campbell, J. H.
McSharry, C.
Aitchison, T. C.
Carter, R.
Stevenson, R. D.
Publication Title: 
The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown a positive treatment effect of individualized homeopathic treatment for acute childhood diarrhea, but sample sizes were small and results were just at or near the level of statistical significance. Because all three studies followed the same basic study design, the combined data from these three studies were analyzed to obtain greater statistical power. METHODS: Three double blind clinical trials of diarrhea in 242 children ages 6 months to 5 years were analyzed as 1 group.

Author(s): 
Jacobs, Jennifer
Jonas, Wayne B.
Jiménez-Pérez, Margarita
Crothers, Dean
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England)

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a prevalent and impairing disorder, associated with extensive psychiatric and medical comorbidity and usually characterized by a chronic course. Different drugs have been investigated in GAD; among them are the following: 1) SSRIs: paroxetine, sertraline, fluvoxamine and escitalopram; 2) SNRI1s: venlafaxine; 3) benzodiazepines (BZs): alprazolam, diazepam and lorazepam; 4) azapirones (AZAs): buspirone; 5) antihistamines (AHs): hydroxyzine; 6) pregabalin (PGB); and 7) complementary/alternative medicine (CAM): kava-kava and homeopathic preparation.

Author(s): 
Hidalgo, Rosario B.
Tupler, Larry A.
Davidson, Jonathan R. T.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Double-Blind Method