Drug Combinations

Publication Title: 
The Journal of Laryngology and Otology

OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence surrounding the use of certain complementary supplements in otolaryngology. We specifically focussed on four commonly used supplements: spirulina, Ginkgo biloba, Vertigoheel and nutritional supplements (cod liver oil, multivitamins and pineapple enzyme). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the English and foreign language literature. INCLUSION CRITERIA: in vivo human studies. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: animal trials, in vitro studies and case reports.

Author(s): 
Karkos, P. D.
Leong, S. C.
Arya, A. K.
Papouliakos, S. M.
Apostolidou, M. T.
Issing, W. J.
Publication Title: 
Arzneimittel-Forschung

The increasing interest in alternative medical practices has led to a number of controlled studies on herbal and homeopathic agents. This paper presents the results of a meta-analysis of four recent clinical trials evaluating the homeopathic preparation Vertigoheel (VH) compared with usual therapies (betahistine, Ginkgo biloba extract, dimenhydrinate) for vertigo in a total of 1388 patients. Two trials were observational studies and the other two were randomised double-blind controlled trials. The duration of treatment (6-8 weeks) and dosage were comparable in all studies.

Author(s): 
Schneider, Berthold
Klein, Peter
Weiser, Michael
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Medicinal plant products are used orally for treating osteoarthritis. Although their mechanisms of action have not yet been elucidated in full detail, interactions with common inflammatory mediators provide a rationale for using them to treat osteoarthritic complaints. OBJECTIVES: To update a previous Cochrane review to assess the benefits and harms of oral medicinal plant products in treating osteoarthritis.

Author(s): 
Cameron, Melainie
Chrubasik, Sigrun
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Laryngology and Otology

OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence surrounding the use of certain complementary supplements in otolaryngology. We specifically focussed on four commonly used supplements: spirulina, Ginkgo biloba, Vertigoheel and nutritional supplements (cod liver oil, multivitamins and pineapple enzyme). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the English and foreign language literature. INCLUSION CRITERIA: in vivo human studies. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: animal trials, in vitro studies and case reports.

Author(s): 
Karkos, P. D.
Leong, S. C.
Arya, A. K.
Papouliakos, S. M.
Apostolidou, M. T.
Issing, W. J.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Laryngology and Otology

OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence surrounding the use of certain complementary supplements in otolaryngology. We specifically focussed on four commonly used supplements: spirulina, Ginkgo biloba, Vertigoheel and nutritional supplements (cod liver oil, multivitamins and pineapple enzyme). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the English and foreign language literature. INCLUSION CRITERIA: in vivo human studies. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: animal trials, in vitro studies and case reports.

Author(s): 
Karkos, P. D.
Leong, S. C.
Arya, A. K.
Papouliakos, S. M.
Apostolidou, M. T.
Issing, W. J.
Publication Title: 
Drugs Under Experimental and Clinical Research

Allergic rhinitis, also known as hay fever, rose fever or summer catarrh, is a major challenge to health professionals. A large number of the world's population, including approximately 40 million Americans, suffers from allergic rhinitis. A novel, botanical formulation (Aller-7) has been developed for the treatment of allergic rhinitis using a combination of extracts from seven medicinal plants, including Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula, T. bellerica, Albizia lebbeck, Piper nigrum, Zingiber officinale and P. longum, which have a proven history of efficacy and health benefits.

Author(s): 
Amit, A.
Saxena, V. S.
Pratibha, N.
D'Souza, P.
Bagchi, M.
Bagchi, D.
Stohs, S. J.
Publication Title: 
Human & Experimental Toxicology

HP-1 a herbal formulation comprising of Phyllanthus niruri and extracts of Terminalia belerica, Terminalia chebula, Phyllanthus emblica and Tinospora cordifolia has been evaluated for hepatoprotective activity against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced toxicity. Results show that HP-1 reversed the leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and prevented the depletion of glutathione (GSH) levels in a primary monolayer culture of rat hepatocytes (in vitro).

Author(s): 
Tasaduq, S. A.
Singh, K.
Sethi, S.
Sharma, S. C.
Bedi, K. L.
Singh, J.
Jaggi, B. S.
Johri, R. K.
Publication Title: 
Human & Experimental Toxicology

Terminalia chebula Gertn. (Combetraceae) is an important herbal drug in Ayurvedic pharmacopea. In the present study, a 95% ethanolic extract of T. chebula (fruit) (TC extract), which was chemically characterized on the basis of chebuloside II as a marker, was investigated for hepatoprotective activity against anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB) drug-induced toxicity. TC extract was found to prevent the hepatotoxicity caused by the administration of rifampicin (RIF), isoniazid (INH) and pyrazinamide (PZA) (in combination) in a sub-chronic mode (12 weeks).

Author(s): 
Tasduq, S. A.
Singh, K.
Satti, N. K.
Gupta, D. K.
Suri, K. A.
Johri, R. K.
Publication Title: 
Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics

Thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (TC) is a cyclic sulfur amino acid, a condensation product of cysteine and formaldehyde. The chemistry, biological effects and clinical use of TC are reviewed. Extensive animal experiments and studies on human subjects carried out in Europe indicate that a combination of TC and folic acid, 'Folcysteine', has revitalizing effects on age-related biochemical variables of blood and tissues. Further animal studies confirmed the anti-toxic effects of TC, particularly on the liver.

Author(s): 
Weber, H. U.
Fleming, J. F.
Miquel, J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Dentistry

OBJECTIVES: This double blind randomized clinical trial evaluated the longevity of the whitening effect (6-month follow-up) of two carbamide peroxide concentrations used in at-home vital bleaching. METHODS: Ninety-two volunteers with shade mean C1 or darker for the six maxillary anterior teeth were randomized into two balanced groups (n=46) according to bleaching agent concentration: 10% (CP10) or 16% (CP16) carbamide peroxide. Patients were instructed to use the whitening agent in a tray for 2h/day during 3 weeks.

Author(s): 
Meireles, S. S.
Heckmann, S. S.
Santos, I. S.
Della Bona, A.
Demarco, F. F.

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