Drug Hypersensitivity

Publication Title: 
The Annals of Pharmacotherapy

OBJECTIVE: To review the pharmacology and mechanisms by which local anesthetics cause allergic reactions. Recommendations concerning appropriate use of local anesthetics and alternative therapies in patients with documented local anesthetic allergies are given. DATA SOURCE: A MEDLINE search of English-language literature identified pertinent clinical studies, case reports, and reviews. The periods of review were Med1, 1990-present, and Med2, 1985-1989, using the MeSH terms drug hypersensitivity and anesthetics. References from the selected studies, case reports, and reviews were reviewed.

Author(s): 
Eggleston, S. T.
Lush, L. W.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

OBJECTIVE: The safety of bee venom as a therapeutic compound has been extensively studied, resulting in the identification of potential adverse events, which range from trivial skin reactions that usually resolve over several days to life-threating severe immunological responses such as anaphylaxis. In this systematic review, we provide a summary of the types and prevalence of adverse events associated with bee venom therapy. METHODS: We searched the literature using 12 databases from their inception to June 2014, without language restrictions.

Author(s): 
Park, Jeong Hwan
Yim, Bo Kyung
Lee, Jun-Hwan
Lee, Sanghun
Kim, Tae-Hun
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Pathology
Author(s): 
Underwood, J. C.
Shahani, R. T.
Blackburn, E. K.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Author(s): 
Weyandt, J. A.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Psychosomatics: Official Publication of the International Psychosomatics Institute
Author(s): 
Morse, D. R.
Schoor, R. S.
Cohen, B. B.
Publication Title: 
Special Care in Dentistry: Official Publication of the American Association of Hospital Dentists, the Academy of Dentistry for the Handicapped, and the American Society for Geriatric Dentistry

Occasionally, a dental patient presents his/her dentist with a history of hypersensitivity to local anesthetic agents. The symptoms may include immediate reactions to the injection procedure (dizziness, shortness of breath, tachycardia, etc), or delayed reactions to the anesthetic (swelling, urticaria, etc). Although the true incidence of local anesthetic allergy is low, such a history often involves the patient's anxiety regarding the use of the drug in question, and the dentist's apprehension to treat the "problematic" patient.

Author(s): 
Kleinhauz, M.
Eli, I.
Publication Title: 
The Annals of Pharmacotherapy

OBJECTIVE: To review the pharmacology and mechanisms by which local anesthetics cause allergic reactions. Recommendations concerning appropriate use of local anesthetics and alternative therapies in patients with documented local anesthetic allergies are given. DATA SOURCE: A MEDLINE search of English-language literature identified pertinent clinical studies, case reports, and reviews. The periods of review were Med1, 1990-present, and Med2, 1985-1989, using the MeSH terms drug hypersensitivity and anesthetics. References from the selected studies, case reports, and reviews were reviewed.

Author(s): 
Eggleston, S. T.
Lush, L. W.
Publication Title: 
Pennsylvania Dental Journal

This article discusses various alternative methods of treating the patient who encounters problems with local anesthetics. Those alternative methods include: acupuncture, hypnosis, sedation, general anesthesia, and antihistamines as a substitute for local anesthetics with more of a focus in using antihistamines as an effective local anesthetic agent. Although not frequently encountered in the clinical setting, allergic reactions to local anesthetics do occur.

Author(s): 
Lu, Dominic P.
Publication Title: 
Anesthesiology

BACKGROUND: Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the adrenergic system can modulate sensitivity to anesthetic-induced immobility and anesthetic-induced hypnosis as well. However, several considerations prevent the conclusion that the endogenous adrenergic ligands norepinephrine and epinephrine alter anesthetic sensitivity. METHODS: Using dopamine ?-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh) mice genetically engineered to lack the adrenergic ligands and their siblings with normal adrenergic levels, we test the contribution of the adrenergic ligands upon volatile anesthetic induction and emergence.

Author(s): 
Hu, Frances Y.
Hanna, George M.
Han, Wei
Mardini, Feras
Thomas, Steven A.
Wyner, Abraham J.
Kelz, Max B.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

During a demonstration of hypnotically induced anesthesia and following a suggestion for a Novocain-like numbness, a totally unanticipated and dramatic swelling of 1 cheek appeared. The participant had forgotten to inform the psychologist that she had experienced the identical reaction to Novocain when she received an injection a few weeks earlier. The swelling was quickly removed by a countersuggestion based upon a simulated injection of the antidote previously administered by the dentist.

Author(s): 
Guttman, Kenneth
Ball, Thomas S.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Drug Hypersensitivity