Drugs, Chinese Herbal

Publication Title: 
Seminars in Reproductive Medicine

Male factor is a common cause of infertility and the male partner must be systematically evaluated in the workup of every infertile couple. Various Eastern medical strategies have been tried with variable success. This article describes the clinical effects of Eastern medicine approaches including acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, massage, yoga, tai chi, and qi gong, which could improve the sperm parameters and motility, genital inflammatory conditions, as well as immune system disorders, sexual dysfunction, and varicocele.

Author(s): 
Hu, Min
Zhang, Yuehui
Ma, Hongli
Ng, Ernest H. Y.
Wu, Xiao-Ke
Publication Title: 
Seminars in Urologic Oncology

There are several other alternative medicines apart from vitamins and minerals that the clinician should be aware of because they have grown in popularity in other fields of medicine. In time, these therapies should impact the arena of urologic oncology. Traditional Chinese Medicine, which includes acupuncture, is an area that has received some attention. The theory behind it can be quite daunting because it is so different from the theory behind Western Medical Science.

Author(s): 
Moyad, M. A.
Hathaway, S.
Ni, H. S.
Publication Title: 
Forschende Komplementarmedizin Und Klassische Naturheilkunde = Research in Complementary and Natural Classical Medicine

INTRODUCTION: The use of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been increasing in the Western world over the last few years. Although Traditional Chinese Pharmacotherapy (TCP) plays a central role in TCM treatment in China, acupuncture is a more common form of treatment in the Western world than TCP. OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to evaluate the quantity and availability of clinical trials on TCP using Medline.

Author(s): 
Pach, D.
Willich, S. N.
Becker-Witt, C.
Publication Title: 
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is becoming increasingly popular, particularly among patients with breast cancer. We have done a systematic review of studies published between 1995 and February 2005, identified through a comprehensive search. CAM encompasses a wide range of treatment modalities, including dietary and vitamin supplements, mind-body approaches, acupuncture, and herbal medicines.

Author(s): 
Gerber, B.
Scholz, C.
Reimer, T.
Briese, V.
Janni, W.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Seizures are poorly controlled in many people with epilepsy despite adequate current antiepileptic treatments. There is increasing interest in alternative therapies such as acupuncture; however, it remains unclear whether the existing evidence is rigorous enough to support the use of acupuncture. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in people with epilepsy.

Author(s): 
Cheuk, D. K. L.
Wong, V.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of International Medical Research

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a complete system of healing that developed in China about 3000 years ago, and includes herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion and massage, etc. In recent decades the use of TCM has become more popular in China and throughout the world. Traditional Japanese medicine has been used for 1500 years and includes Kampo-yaku (herbal medicine), acupuncture and acupressure. Kampo is now widely practised in Japan and is fully integrated into the modern health-care system. Kampo is based on TCM but has been adapted to Japanese culture.

Author(s): 
Yu, F.
Takahashi, T.
Moriya, J.
Kawaura, K.
Yamakawa, J.
Kusaka, K.
Itoh, T.
Morimoto, S.
Yamaguchi, N.
Kanda, T.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Conventional treatment for primary dysmenorrhoea (PD) has a failure rate of 20% to 25% and may be contraindicated or not tolerated by some women. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) may be a suitable alternative. OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy and safety of CHM for PD when compared with placebo, no treatment, and other treatment.

Author(s): 
Zhu, X.
Proctor, M.
Bensoussan, A.
Smith, C. A.
Wu, E.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Conventional treatment for primary dysmenorrhoea has a failure rate of 20% to 25% and may be contraindicated or not tolerated by some women. Chinese herbal medicine may be a suitable alternative. OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine for primary dysmenorrhoea when compared with placebo, no treatment, and other treatment.

Author(s): 
Zhu, X.
Proctor, M.
Bensoussan, A.
Wu, E.
Smith, C. A.
Publication Title: 
Forschende Komplementarmedizin (2006)

BACKGROUND: In the 'Klinik am Steigerwald' (Gerolzhofen, Germany), founded in 1996 and providing accommodation for 44 patients, European physicians apply methods of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). OBJECTIVE: To develop an assessment system which is suitable for the evaluation of therapies, can be integrated into daily routine, takes into account the particular therapeutic approach of the hospital, and promotes quality management. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The hospital admits all kinds of patients with chronic and often therapy-resistant diseases.

Author(s): 
Schmincke, Christian
Torres-Londoño, Paula
Seiling, Monika
Gaus, Wilhelm
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Seizures are poorly controlled in many people with epilepsy despite adequate current antiepileptic treatments. There is increasing interest in alternative therapies such as acupuncture; however, it remains unclear whether the existing evidence is rigorous enough to support the use of acupuncture. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2006. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in people with epilepsy.

Author(s): 
Cheuk, Daniel K. L.
Wong, Virginia

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