Dysmenorrhea

Publication Title: 
Journal of Physiotherapy

QUESTION: In women with primary dysmenorrhoea, what is the effect of physiotherapeutic interventions compared to control (either no treatment or placebo/sham) on pain and quality of life? DESIGN: Systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis. PARTICIPANTS: Women with primary dysmenorrhea. INTERVENTION: Any form of physiotherapy treatment. OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was menstrual pain intensity and the secondary outcome was quality of life. RESULTS: The search yielded 222 citations. Of these, 11 were eligible randomised trials and were included in the review.

Author(s): 
Kannan, Priya
Claydon, Leica Sarah
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Dysmenorrhoea is the occurrence of painful menstrual cramps of the uterus. Medical therapy for dysmenorrhoea commonly consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or the oral contraceptive pill both of which work by reducing myometrial (uterine muscle) activity. However, these treatments are accompanied by a number of side effects, making an effective non-pharmacological method of treating dysmenorrhoea of potential value. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a treatment that has been shown to be effective for pain relief in a variety of conditions.

Author(s): 
Proctor, M. L.
Smith, C. A.
Farquhar, C. M.
Stones, R. W.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care

BACKGROUND: Acupuncture as a therapy, and acupressure as self-treatment, are increasingly widely used for gynaecological conditions, and this study aims to review the scientific literature on their effectiveness. METHOD: A systematic review of controlled trials of acupuncture or acupressure for gynaecological conditions, published in a European language. SYNTHESIS: No studies in mastalgia, menorrhagia, pelvic pain, premenstrual syndrome or vulvodynia met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
White, A. R.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Conventional treatment for primary dysmenorrhoea (PD) has a failure rate of 20% to 25% and may be contraindicated or not tolerated by some women. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) may be a suitable alternative. OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy and safety of CHM for PD when compared with placebo, no treatment, and other treatment.

Author(s): 
Zhu, X.
Proctor, M.
Bensoussan, A.
Smith, C. A.
Wu, E.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Conventional treatment for primary dysmenorrhoea has a failure rate of 20% to 25% and may be contraindicated or not tolerated by some women. Chinese herbal medicine may be a suitable alternative. OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine for primary dysmenorrhoea when compared with placebo, no treatment, and other treatment.

Author(s): 
Zhu, X.
Proctor, M.
Bensoussan, A.
Wu, E.
Smith, C. A.
Publication Title: 
Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica

BACKGROUND: Acupuncture-related therapies might be an effective intervention for primary dysmenorrhea. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of acupuncture-related therapies for treating primary dysmenorrhea. SEARCH STRATEGY: A specified literature search was performed of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CNKI, and CBM databases. SELECTION CRITERIA: All clinical controlled trials pertaining to acupuncture-related therapies for primary dysmenorrhea were included, and the quality of the trials was assessed.

Author(s): 
Yang, Huan
Liu, Cun-Zhi
Chen, Xu
Ma, Liang-Xiao
Xie, Jie-Ping
Guo, Nan-Nan
Ma, Zeng-Bin
Zheng, Yuan-Yuan
Zhu, Jiang
Liu, Jian-Ping
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Dysmenorrhoea may begin soon after the menarche, after which it often improves with age, or it may originate later in life after the onset of an underlying causative condition. Dysmenorrhoea is common, and in up to 20% of women it may be severe enough to interfere with daily activities. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for dysmenorrhoea?

Author(s): 
Proctor, Michelle L.
Farquhar, Cynthia M.
Publication Title: 
BJOG: an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology

BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of acupuncture in primary dysmenorrhoea is not fully understood. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for the symptomatic treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). SEARCH STRATEGY: Nineteen electronic databases, including English, Korean, Japanese and Chinese databases, were systematically searched for RCTs investigating acupuncture for primary dysmenorrhoea up to July 2008 with no language restrictions.

Author(s): 
Cho, S.-H.
Hwang, E.-W.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Dysmenorrhoea is the occurrence of painful menstrual cramps of the uterus. Medical therapy for dysmenorrhoea commonly consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or the oral contraceptive pill both of which work by reducing myometrial (uterine muscle) activity. However, these treatments are accompanied by a number of side effects, making an effective non-pharmacological method of treating dysmenorrhoea of potential value. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a treatment that has been shown to be effective for pain relief in a variety of conditions.

Author(s): 
Proctor, M. L.
Smith, C. A.
Farquhar, C. M.
Stones, R. W.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Conventional treatment for primary dysmenorrhoea (PD) has a failure rate of 20% to 25% and may be contraindicated or not tolerated by some women. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) may be a suitable alternative. OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy and safety of CHM for PD when compared with placebo, no treatment, and other treatment.

Author(s): 
Zhu, X.
Proctor, M.
Bensoussan, A.
Smith, C. A.
Wu, E.

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