Ear, External

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: This study was done to determine the specificity and sensitivity of a commercial Pointer Plus (Point finder) in detecting a region of low skin resistance on the ear. DESIGN: This was a prospective blinded study. SETTING/LOCATION: The study was done at the Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT. SUBJECTS: The subjects were men and women who work at Yale New Haven Hospital. INTERVENTIONS: There were no interventions. OUTCOME MEASURES: Correlations were made between self-reported musculoskeletal pain and the detection of low skin resistance on the ear.

Author(s): 
Wang, Shu-Ming
Maranets, Inna
Lin, Eric C.
DeZinno, Peggy
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Plastic Surgery

There is no universally agreed policy for treating keloid scars of the ear lobe following piercing. We treated 35 patients (34 women) for high-risk ear-lobe keloids; the average age was 24 years (range: 16-44 years). All had failed to respond to prior treatment with massage and silicone, and corticosteroid injection. The keloids were excised extralesionally and the defects were closed with interrupted prolene sutures. The operative scar was covered with topical 2% lignocaine-0.25% chlorhexidine sterile lubricant gel under a transparent adhesive dressing.

Author(s): 
Ragoowansi, R.
Cornes, P. G.
Glees, J. P.
Powell, B. W.
Moss, A. L.
Publication Title: 
Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin

The barks and roots of Edgeworthia chrysantha LINDL., which have been used as the folk medicine "Zhu shima" in southern China due to their detumescence and acesodyne effects, were investigated for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities using a xylene-induced ear edema assay in mice and Freund's complete adjuvant-induced paw edema as inflammation models, and the acetic acid-induced writhing test as an analgesic model. Fractions effective in terms of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities were obtained from E. chrysantha.

Author(s): 
Hu, Xiao-Jia
Jin, Hui-Zi
Xu, Wen-Zheng
Chen, Ming
Liu, Xiao-Hua
Zhang, Wei
Su, Juan
Zhang, Chuan
Zhang, Wei-Dong
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether stimulation of the auricular sympathetic acupuncture point would affect the mean maximum amplitude of evoked sudomotor responses. DESIGN: A placebo-controlled trial. Two types of controls were used: no acupuncture and acupuncture of an alternate "non-sympathetic nervous system" related (i.e., a non-sympathetic, placebo) point. Subjects were included in either the placebo or the test group. Each subject would have one session of acupuncture and one session without acupuncture, the acupuncture was applied in either the first or the second session.

Author(s): 
Young, M. F.
McCarthy, P. W.
Publication Title: 
Chinese Medical Journal

In the evaluation of Chinese herbs (A), ear-acupuncture (B) and epidural morphine (C) to relieve postoperative pain and abdominal distension, sixteen male patients with primary liver cancer were observed. This study was conducted by means of orthogonal experiment and double blind, randomized design. The patients received various treatments according to the display of the orthogonal table L16(2)15 which corresponds to 2(3) factorial experiment design. C+ (morphine 2 mg) was given before the peritoneum was sutured. A+ (orally administered) and B+ were given 24 hours after operation.

Author(s): 
Li, Q. S.
Cao, S. H.
Xie, G. M.
Gan, Y. H.
Ma, H. J.
Lu, J. Z.
Zhang, Z. H.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Twenty-four subjects ranging from 5 to 33% above ideal weight were weighted during a 3-week control period, and then treated for the successive 9 weeks with acupuncture therapy given in three different loci, and in random order for 3-week periods. The acupuncture needles were placed in unilateral loci used by oriental acupuncturists for weight loss, in the same loci bilaterally, and in unilateral loci not used by acupuncturists for weight loss. No undesirable effects were noted. No treatment was associated with weight reduction significant at the 0.05 confidence level.

Author(s): 
Mok, M. S.
Parker, L. N.
Voina, S.
Bray, G. A.
Publication Title: 
Physical Therapy

This study was conducted to examine the effects of high intensity transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation at auricular acupuncture points on experimental pain threshold. Forty-five healthy adult male and female subjects were assigned randomly to one of two treatment groups or to a control group. Subjects in the two treatment groups received high intensity TENS to either appropriate or inappropriate (placebo) acupuncture points on one ear. Experimental pain threshold at the ipsilateral wrist was determined with a painful electrical stimulus before and after ear stimulation.

Author(s): 
Oliveri, A. C.
Clelland, J. A.
Jackson, J.
Knowles, C.
Publication Title: 
Physical Therapy

This study compared the effects of unilateral and bilateral auricular transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on cutaneous pain threshold. Auricular acupuncture points were stimulated with low frequency, high intensity TENS for 45 seconds. Sixty healthy, adult subjects were assigned randomly to one of two treatment groups or to a control group. The two treatment groups received low frequency, high intensity TENS either unilaterally or bilaterally. The control group did not receive auricular stimulation.

Author(s): 
Krause, A. W.
Clelland, J. A.
Knowles, C. J.
Jackson, J. R.
Publication Title: 
Physical Therapy

The purposes of this study were 1) to examine the effect of high intensity, low frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation at auricular acupuncture points on experimental pain threshold measured at the wrist and 2) to determine the changes in effect over time. Forty-four healthy adult men and women were assigned randomly to one of three treatment groups. Group 1 (n = 15) received TENS to appropriate auricular points for wrist pain, Group 2 (n = 14) received TENS to inappropriate (placebo) auricular points, and Group 3 (n = 15) received no TENS.

Author(s): 
Noling, L. B.
Clelland, J. A.
Jackson, J. R.
Knowles, C. J.
Publication Title: 
Physical Therapy

The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effectiveness of auricular acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain. Fifteen subjects (6 men, 9 women) experiencing distal extremity pain received either one placebo pill or a 10-minute treatment of acupuncture-like TENS bilaterally to five acupuncture points on the auricle. Pain levels were measured before treatment and at 0, 10, and 30 minutes posttreatment using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the pain rating index (PRI) of the McGill Pain Questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Longobardi, A. G.
Clelland, J. A.
Knowles, C. J.
Jackson, J. R.

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